The ongoing legal battle between former Vancouver Olympic CEO John Furlong and journalist Laura Robinson is expected to return to court on Monday.

Robinson is asking the court to order Furlong to post a $100,000 security to cover a potential cost award in her favour, under the laws set out in Canada's Slander and Libel Act.

Furlong is suing Robinson for libel after she published an article in the Georgia Straight newspaper alleging he abused several students at a Burns Lake school when he was a gym teacher in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Furlong has vehemently denied the allegations and vowed to clear his name in court.

Robinson makes application to court

But Furlong recently dropped the Georgia Straight newspaper from the lawsuit, and Robinson's Nov. 22 application to the court claims that this is an indication his lawsuit is without merit.

"It is significant that the plaintiff has chosen to cut his losses and pay the Georgia Straight's costs in accordance with Rule 9-8(4)," said Robinson's notice of application.

"This decisions suggests that the plaintiff is possessed of insufficient property to satisfy any order for costs following after trial and/or has an inadequately meritorious case to risk the very significant cost consequences of an unfavourable verdict."

Furlong files first affidavit

In his affidavit filed on Dec. 5, Furlong alleges that the publication of Robinson's allegations has ruined his career as a public speaker.

"Her request to post $100,000 plus with the court is not possible. Given the damage done to me, I require use of all available funds to rebuild my business, meet my own living costs and attempt to reverse the damage done to my reputation and career…" said Furlong in his first affidavit.

The issue is scheduled to be heard Monday in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver.

Three of the students named in Robinson's article have also filed lawsuits against Furlong.

None of the allegations have been proven in court.

On mobile? Click here for John Furlong's affidavit online