Jeremy Clarkson, BBC host, stranded in Trail, B.C.

The host of one of the world's best-known television shows found himself stranded a small town in the B.C. interior this past weekend.

One of Britain's highest paid television personalities spent Sunday stranded in a West Kootenay town

Jeremy Clarkson tweeted this photo of downtown Trail, B.C. to his four million followers on Sunday, after letting them know he was "marooned" because of bad weather. (Jeremy Clarkson/Twitter)

The host of one of the world's best-known television shows found himself stranded a small town in the B.C. interior this past weekend.

Jeremy Clarkson and his crew from the BBC show Top Gear — recognized by the Guinness book of World Records as the world's most widely viewed factual t.v. show — found themselves stranded in Trail, B.C. because of poor weather.

Clarkson's twitter account was soon flooded with suggestions, including a tour of the local lead and zinc smelter, a visit to a local winery, a meal at an Italian restaurant and — strangely — an invitation to the local supermarket to learn how to properly butcher a goat.

In the end — despite low lying cloud — Clarkson and his crew were able to fly out of the town's tiny airport Sunday afternoon.

Top Gear had been filming in the South Okanagan and the West Kootenay over the weekend, and for the most part kept their location a secret, in order to film undisturbed.

Last week Jon Summerland with the Okanagan Film Commission told CBC News the show came to B.C. to film a segment with a Hennessey VelociRaptor, a Ford F-150 converted into a high-performance-SUV.

"Because the vehicle that they're going to be doing the show on, the Hennessey VelociRaptor, they wanted to show it in a variety of terrains, from highway driving, to mountains, to dirt, to climbing up trees, to going up snow, so British Columbia was hot on their radar," said Summerland.

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