Jackson Reid stands guard in memory of slain soldiers

A 13-year-old boy is standing guard this weekend at the cenotaph in Port Coquitlam in memory of two soldiers slain in terrorist attacks this week.

Teen, just one of many Canadians, soliders and civilians, standing guard at cenotaphs this weekend

Jackson Reid, 13, is standing guard at the cenotaph in Port Coquitlam, B.C., in honour of two Canadian soldiers slain this week. (CBC)

A 13-year-old boy is standing guard this weekend at the cenotaph in Port Coquitlam in memory of two soldiers slain in terrorist attacks this week.

Jackson Reid, who only became a cadet a month ago, says it is his way of honouring Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, shot and killed at the cenotaph in Ottawa and Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent, killed in a hit-and-run just outside Montreal, both in targeted attacks.

"I'm basically doing what all soldiers do being respectful and I feel proud when I'm doing it," Reid told CBC News.

Reid has been standing guard for two hours a day since Friday. And he's not alone. All across Canada, veterans and civilians alike are standing in front of cenotaphs.      

Jackson's mother, Heidi Roggio-Reid, says she feels incredibly proud

"It was just his pure intention of showing respect and honouring someone who fell in the line of duty," she said.

Jackson says he's planning on finishing out the weekend on Sunday with another two-hour shift.

Reid is just one of many Canadians standing guard at cenotaphs this weekend.

In B.C. veterans and civilians also stood on guard in Nanaimo and in Vancouver's Victory Square where old veterans and young cadets stood side-by-side finishing the shift Nathan Cirrillo was not able to complete.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.