ICBC says it is considering a review of Diamond Parking after a CBC Go Public story revealed drivers are accusing the company of issuing unwarranted tickets.

On Monday, Go Public told the stories of two drivers who say they were handed bogus parking tickets by Diamond Parking.

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The story revealed ICBC provides private parking companies with the name and address of a vehicle owner if a licence plate number is submitted.

The B.C. Privacy Association says ICBC can legally hand over names and addresses to Diamond Parking, but only if the information is used properly.

In an email to Go Public on Tuesday, ICBC said there are safeguards in place to protect information provided to parking lot operators, including the right to audit.

"In our last review of Diamond Parking, no concerns were found. We are following up with Diamond Parking and may consider another review," ICBC said in a written statement.

"If someone feels they have incorrectly received a ticket they should make that appeal with the parking lot company."

'Nobody's looking after the public'

After the Go Public investigation aired, dozens of angry drivers contacted CBC News with similar stories, calling on ICBC to stop giving their personal information to Diamond Parking.

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Drivers want ICBC to stop giving their personal information to Diamond Parking. (CBC)

Scott Lees says he was ticketed even though his car wasn’t parked in a Diamond Parking lot.

Now, he receives several calls every week looking for the $128 the company says he owes.

"I don't have any recourse as far as I know," he told CBC News. "I can pay the fine or I can accept the harassment."

Gary Millar was fined $112 for leaving his vehicle in a Safeway lot, but insists he did nothing wrong.

Both drivers are angry ICBC turned over their personal information to Diamond Parking.

"Nobody's looking after the public here," Millar said. "Diamond's making money, ICBC's making money, and the public's getting charged $112 for going to buy a quart of milk."

Submit your story ideas to Kathy Tomlinson at Go Public