Hundreds honour slain sisters at candlelight vigil in Oak Bay, B.C.

Mourners gathered on a beach Saturday to remember two young sisters — Chloe Berry, 6, and her sister Aubrey Berry, 4 — found dead in a Victoria-area home on Christmas Day.

Chloe Berry, 6, and her sister Aubrey Berry, 4, were found dead in a Victoria-area home

The bodies of Chloe Berry, 6, and her sister Aubrey, 4, were found in an Oak Bay apartment on Christmas Day. (Submitted)

The moonlight cast a shimmering glow on the ocean as hundreds of people holding candles stood silently Saturday night to honour two young B.C. sisters found dead on Christmas Day.

Mourners gathered on a local beach to remember the sisters — Chloe Berry, 6, and her 4-year-old sister Aubrey Berry — found slain in a Victoria-area home.

Children holding candles stood close to their parents as a piano played at Willows Beach.

A mother and her children listened to speeches and held candles at the vigil, which organizers says is to help the community try and heal. (CBC)

"To all of us this means the community is holding us in their embrace," said family friend Sandra Hudson, who said she knows the family well and they regularly took vacations together. "We're all devastated."

The District of Oak Bay organized the candlelight vigil, saying the deaths have shaken the Victoria-area community and the event was an opportunity for people to come to gather in grief and love.

Police have said they were called to a residence in Oak Bay on Monday evening where the bodies of two children were discovered.

Hundreds gathered at Willows Beach in Oak Bay B.C. on Dec. 30, 2017 to participate in a candlelight vigil to honour sisters Chloe and Aubrey Berry. (CBC)

A friend and a family member have identified the girls.

Police have said an injured man, whose condition has not been disclosed, was found inside the home and taken to hospital.

The Vancouver Island Integrated Major Crime Unit is investigating the deaths as a double homicide.

Family friend Trisha Lees said the ceremony at Willows Beach where the girls often played is the start of what will be a difficult grieving process. (CBC)

Family friend Trisha Lees said the ceremony at Willows Beach where the girls often played is the start of what will be a difficult grieving process.

"The girls were the type of people who need to be honoured," Lees said.

Hundreds of people stood together holding candles at the hour-long vigil, which featured speeches and music.

With files from CBC News