The father of a White Rock, B.C. teen who died of a drug overdose is calling for police action after he created a Facebook group identifying a man he claims is responsible for his daughter's death.

Adriana Falcon, 15, was found dead at a Vancouver boarding house in September. Toxicology reports revealed that a lethal mix of methamphetamine and heroin was the cause of her death.

Now Adriana's father, Rick Falcon, has started a Facebook group that outs the identity and address of a 28-year-old Vancouver man that he claims sold Adriana drugs and was with her when she overdosed.

"We want to expose this person. My daughter deserves justice. I think this person is a threat to anybody who comes into contact with him particularly young women," says Falcon.

Falcon has become increasingly frustrated with what he says is a lack of police interest in following up on details the family has passed on to them.

"They didn't think any of the information that we were providing to them was relevant to the case of Adriana," he says.

However, police maintain that the death was not suspicious, so the investigation rests solely with the B.C. Coroners Service.

"In this case we're not looking at a crime being committed," said Sgt. Randy Fincham.

"We're looking at a young individual — in this case a 15-year-old girl — that in all accounts it appears unfortunately died as a result of the consumption of illicit drugs."

Fincham said he understands how distraught Falcon must be over the death of his daughter, but said he needs to be careful.

"I would hate to see this father get into any trouble...or be made out to be the bad guy..because he has put up the
picture of a person that hasn't proven to be at fault in a court of law...or is currently being investigated by the police."

A spokesperson with the Coroners Service told CBC News that Falcon's case is "very much an active investigation" and in the event that something is discovered that indicates she died at the hands of another, police can re-open the case.

Adriana's father says that if that does happen, it might be too late.

"Our information suggests that he's a very, very, very dangerous threat to young women, particularly young women at risk that are on the street," he said.

With files from Belle Puri