A disgraced Edmonton RCMP officer being transferred to B.C. will not be patrolling the streets and will be closely watched by his superiors, a spokesman for the force says.

It was revealed Tuesday that Sgt. Don Ray was demoted from the rank of staff sergeant and docked 10 days' pay following a disciplinary hearing last winter.

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RCMP officer Don Ray posed for this photo while training civilian police in Sierra Leone in 2003-2004. (Our Canada Magazine)

Ray admitted that over a three-year period, he had sex with subordinates, drank with them at work and sexually harassed them. He also was found to have used his position to favour female potential employees.

In B.C., Ray will be working in a federal policing capacity and will not be part of any provincial or municipal policing contract,  Sgt. Rob Vermeulen said in an email to CBC News.

"Senior managers are aware of the behaviour that led to his discipline and will be monitoring him closely to ensure that the disciplinary measures are having the desired effect and the offending behaviour does not recur," Vermeulen said.

Vermeulen would not reveal where Ray will be stationed in B.C.

'Public relations nightmare'

Some believe Ray got off lightly and should have been fired.

"He should be encouraged to retire or forcibly removed," said Krista Carle, a former B.C. RCMP constable who is involved in a class action lawsuit against the force for alleged sexual harassment.

Carle said that simply transferring Ray to another province is "shameful," and described the demoted officer as "a public relations nightmare" for the force.

Since a CBC News investigation in November revealed allegations of a widespread culture of sexual harassment within the RCMP, several current and former female officers have come forward to make similar complaints.

The handling of Ray's case will not help in improving relations between senior RCMP staff and employees, said Mike Webster, a police psychologist on Vancouver Island.

"Female members within the RCMP are not going to feel safe working in that environment as a result of this decision," he said. "The organization is riddled with a toxic environment, high levels of employee stress and a culture of fear."

 

With files from the CBC's Meera Bains