A B.C. woman suspected in the May 3 traffic death of Kassandra Kaulius gave a breath sample at twice the limit for impairment, according to court documents obtained by CBC News.

Kaulius, 22, died after a collision at a Surrey intersection in which her car was T-boned by a van driven by a woman who was placed under arrest at the scene, but who has not yet been charged.

The court documents show the van driver, 34, had a blood alcohol reading of .16 â€” twice the legal limit — two hours after the collision.

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The driver of the van that collided with Kassandra Kaulius's car is taken into custody. (CBC)

The documents also indicate police seized the driver's phone records and clothing.

RCMP investigators allege the woman's common-law-husband told them she drank a bottle and a half of wine before she drove that night.

The documents recount witness statements that the van appeared to be driving between 80 and 100 km/h as it entered the intersection where it hit the car being driven by Kaulius, who died at the scene.

Phoned common-law husband

Police found the suspect apparently hiding in the bush near the accident scene, with one officer claiming her eyes were bloodshot, that she appeared to be sleepy and that she staggered while walking.

In a statement by the common-law husband, he said he spoke on the phone to the van driver as she sat on the ground before being found by police.

"She was upset and said, 'The cops are after me. I'm at 152nd and 64th bushes,'" the documents quote the husband as saying.

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Kassandra Kaulius, 22, died after her car was hit by another vehicle driven by an allegedly impaired driver. (CBC)

Kassandra Kaulius's mother, Markita Kaulius, told CBC News Thursday that she looks forward to the trial of whoever was responsible for her daughter's death.

"I'm not a vengeful person," Kaulius said. "I'm not out looking for blood. But I want someone to be held accountable."

It is common in such cases for charges not to be laid for several months while police investigate and Crown prosecutors work to determine the strength of potential evidence.

With files from the CBC's Jason Proctor and Eric Rankin