A Chilliwack man says he's lucky to be alive after his car was rear ended by a tractor-trailer on Highway One early Wednesday, sending it flying onto a water-filled ditch.

'I know you’re scared, but you have to turn yourself in. I’m not dead. I know you’re worried about that, but I’m not.'- Scott Grant

Scott Grant says he was driving home from work around 3 a.m. PT doing the speed limit in the slow lane when a semi truck smashed into the back of his car somewhere between Young and Prest Roads.

Grant Scott

Grant Scott's smashed-up sits in a lot. (CBC)

Grant says he remembers seeing two bright headlights in his rear view mirror, and then getting hit from behind.

"It felt like a train hitting you,”  he said.

Grant estimates he was travelling at 100 km/h when the force of the impact sent his car flying off the road, where it flipped several times before landing in a ditch. He says he was stuck in water up to his waist.

Cpl Len vanNieuwenhuizen with the Upper Fraser Valley RCMP says it was quite a collision.

"We seized the vehicle bumper. There was a partial imprint of the licence plate from the truck so that indicates how hard the truck must have hit the vehicle."

No one would stop

Grant says he was sore and soaking wet when he pulled himself up the steep embankment. He spent about an hour trying to flag down a car for help, but no one would stop.

Stephanie Brown

Grant Scott's step daughter Stephanie Brown says it's it's alarming to know someone could do that and just keep going. (CBC)

He says he walked about a kilometre to the nearest road, and then another kilometre to a gas station so he could call for help.

Grant's car was smashed beyond recognition.

His step daughter, Stephanie Brown, says it's alarming to know someone could do that and just keep going.

“It’s scary to think there are people out there driving on our highways that will rear end your vehicle and they don’t even stop.”

Grant says he came forward to give the semi-driver an opportunity to do the right thing.

“I know you’re scared, but you have to turn yourself in. I’m not dead. I know you’re worried about that, but I’m not.”

Despite the horrific impact, Grant didn’t break any bones, but is still hurting and isn’t sure when he’ll be able to go back to work. 

Despite the pain, he says he's happy to be alive and thinks he must had someone watching over him.

With files from the CBC's Richard Zussman