Census 2016: Youth in the North, seniors on the Island

The national Census release on age showed there are more seniors than children for the first time in Canada. In B.C., the two groups are concentrated in different areas of the province, with youth in the North and seniors on Vancouver Island.

Metro Vancouver has most of the working-aged adults, but Whistler tops the list

In B.C., children and seniors are concentrated in different areas of the province, the 2016 Census shows. (YouTube)

Statistics Canada's 2016 census data on age shows there are more seniors than children for the first time in Canada.

In B.C., the census shows the two groups are concentrated in different areas of the province, with youth in the North and seniors on Vancouver Island.

Where are the children?

Four out of five of B.C.'s youngest communities are in the North. An administrative region in the Peace River area topped the list, followed by the city of Fort St. John.

In the Metro Vancouver area, Squamish had the highest proportion of children, followed by Chilliwack, Mission and Abbotsford.

Where are the seniors?

They are mostly on Vancouver Island. Qualicum Beach is the only region in B.C. where more than half the population is over the age of 65.

White Rock is Metro Vancouver's oldest community, with just over a third of the population over 65.

Where are the working-aged adults?

They are skiing in Whistler. Whistler topped the list with more than 80 per cent of the population aged 15-64. 

Outside of Whistler, the cities with the most working-aged adults are almost exclusively in Metro Vancouver, with the exceptions of Fort St. John and Esquimalt, just outside Victoria.

A note on methodology: CBC News limited its analysis to municipalities and regions in B.C. with more than 5,000 people. 

About the Author

Tara Carman

Data Journalist

Tara Carman is an investigative journalist who specializes in finding the stories buried in big data. She has more than a decade of experience reporting in B.C., across Canada and overseas. She joined CBC News in February 2017. You can reach her at tara.carman@cbc.ca or on Twitter @tarajcarman.