Organizers say they hope typos on the dedication plaque on the statue of Victoria artist Emily Carr will be fixed next month. ((CBC))

A bronze statue of the late West Coast artist Emily Carr was unveiled near her home in Victoria, but it was the dedication plaque that soon caught some unexpected attention.

The three-metre-tall statue of Carr gazing out to sea with her pet monkey, Woo, on her shoulder and her faithful dog, Billy, by her feet was unveiled next to the Empress Hotel on Victoria's downtown waterfront on Wednesday.

"They've caught the lady. They've caught the monkey. They've caught the dog.  It's almost as if they are coming alive," said John Richardson, as he admired the bronze sculpture of the Victoria artist on Thursday.

"I think it's beautiful," said his wife, Penny.

But a short distance away, others made a disturbing discovery shortly after the statue was unveiled on Wednesday, according to Ann Geddes, chair of the sculpture's fundraising committee.

On the plaque, the letter "n" was omitted in the phrase, "Victoria's best know citizen," along with the needed hyphen between best and what should have read "known."

"A disaster — a disaster...I don't know when that happened," Geddes told CBC News on Thursday.

Statue creator forgives mistake

Carr is best known for her post-impressionist paintings depicting the rugged and moody West Coast rainforest and her portrayal of remote First Nations villages.

She was born in Victoria in 1871 and died in 1945.

Emily Carr Statue, Victoria

The statue of Emily Carr features the artist with her pet monkey and dog. (Sam Bufalini)

Edmonton artist Barbara Paterson, who created the statue but not the plaque, says her heart goes out to the fundraising committee.

"They thought they were dotting every "i" and crossing every ["t"] … But you know, if that's the only flaw in this whole huge long route, I think we're laughing," she said.

The fundraising committee hopes to have a plan to correct the errors by next month.