Bear shot after breaking into West Vancouver garage

One of two bears that broke into a West Vancouver garage to get the food in a freezer has been shot, after it returned while workers were replacing the broken door.

Bear was one of two attracted to the home by food in a freezer, say police

Conservation officer killed bear initially attracted by freezer 2:02

One of two bears that broke into a West Vancouver garage to get the food in a freezer has been shot, after it returned while workers were replacing the broken door.

West Vancouver Police were first called to the 200-block of Onslow Place in the British Properties Tuesday morning, after two bears broke through the side door to the garage, pried open a chest freezer and began feeding.

Police used air horns to frighten the bears back into a nearby wooded area near the Capilano Golf Club and a B.C. Conservation Officer was called in to trap the bears for relocation.

West Vancouver Police say food and garbage should be stored in secure areas to avoid attracting black bears. (Canadian Press)

Later on, while some workers were installing a temporary cover on the damaged doorway, one of the bears returned to the property and was shot and killed by the conservation officer. It was estimated to be about four years old.

The other bear has not been seen since it was chased away.

Officials are urging all residents to ensure their properties are free of attractants to bears, for the safety of both humans and bears.

"Storing food in garages or outbuildings should be avoided if odours from the food can escape the enclosure and if doors to any enclosure are not strong enough to be bear resistant," said a statement issued by police.

"The door in this occurrence was a light duty hollow core door more commonly used for interior rooms and appeared to have been readily broken through."

Google Maps: Onslow Place, West Vancouver

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