A serial rapist living in B.C. has had his day parole extended for another six months, with the parole board saying his continued rehabilitation will "contribute to the protection of society," as he reintegrates as a "law-abiding citizen."

Larry Takahashi "doesn't present an undue risk to society," according to a decision from the Parole Board of Canada.

It said he's abided by the conditions of his parole since it was first granted more than a year ago and that his risk to reoffend can be "managed." 

Takahashi, known as the "balaclava rapist", is serving three life sentences for attacking 23 victims in Edmonton throughout the early '80s. 

He was originally charged with 70 sexual offences but pleaded guilty to 14 as part of a plea bargain.

Parole begins

Takahashi, now 65, was granted day parole in B.C. last year after serving 32 years in prison. He lives in a residential facility somewhere in Metro Vancouver.

The board said he didn't leave the centre for more than a month after his initial parole because of the media attention, only leaving escorted for a few hours at a time.

August's decision noted that he's participated in voluntary counselling sessions, risk assessments and sex offender programming. 

Takahashi's risk is being "actively managed," it said.

Larry Takahashi

Larry Takahashi, shown here in an undated file photo, was sentenced to three life sentences for a series of sexual assaults in Edmonton in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Under his parole conditions, Takahashi isn't allowed to consume alcohol or drugs, access pornography or use a computer without supervision. He's also under a curfew, is subject to electronic monitoring and can't leave the city he lives in unless he's pre-approved for a trip.

The board has also ordered him to report any kind of relationship with a woman — sexual or not — to his parole supervisor.

"You have brutalized women," read the board's decision. "Your movements and associations with women must be restricted and strictly monitored in order to prevent any re-offence."

The Correctional Service of Canada recommended the board authorize overnight privileges, but it declined, saying Takahashi hasn't "yet developed the stability or supports to be granted" such permission.