B.C. wolf cull leads to 'removal' of 84 wolves

The B.C. government says 84 wolves have been "removed" in hopes of saving caribou herds in the South Selkirk Mountains and South Peace region.

The wolves were shot from helicopters, as government tries to save caribou herds

The province says 84 wolves were 'removed' as part of its wolf cull project. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press)

The B.C. government says 84 wolves have been "removed" in hopes of saving caribou herds in the province's South Selkirk Mountains and South Peace region.

The province started its controversial wolf cull on Jan. 15, 2015, the first year of a five-year plan to cull the wolves, which were shot from helicopters.

"Habitat recovery continues to be an important part of caribou recovery, but cannot address the critical needs of these herds in the short term," said the government in a statement.

The B.C. government says 40 per cent of caribou deaths are being caused by wolves. (Wildlife Infometrics)

The province said this year's cull is now over, with 11 wolves removed from the South Selkirks region, and 73 from the South Peace.

Some wolves that were originally targeted remain and are being tracked, according to the province. They're currently not in caribou territory. 

A number of mountain caribou herds are on the brink of local extinction in parts of B.C.

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