B.C. Coast Guard Auxiliary gets new name

Volunteer marine rescuers in B.C. are getting a new name — the Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue.
Volunteer marine rescuers in B.C. get a new name and a new boat 1:59

Volunteer marine rescuers in B.C. are getting a new name — the Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue.

FAQs

  • Rescue crews responded to 700 missions in 2011 and assisted more than 850 people.
  • Typical tasks include fires, sinking or overturned watercraft, weather-related emergencies and searches in the water or along shorelines.
  • The crew's vessels range from Zodiac-style fast response boats to large enclosed-cabin vessels.
  • All the Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue rescue crews and their shore-based supporters are volunteers.
  • Crews receive high-level training in seamanship, navigation, communications and first aid.
  • Crew members contributed more than 55,000 hours of service in 2011.

Formerly the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, the 150-year-old organization has stations in 46 communities throughout B.C.

"We work very closely with the Canadian Coast Guard but we are a separate organization," said Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue president Randy Strandt.

"Our new name recognizes the distinct identity of our service, and helps emphasize the strong links we have to the communities that depend on us, and on which we depend for fundraising."

The name change affects more than 1,000 members in B.C. Their area of operation covers more than 27,000 square kilometres of B.C. coastline.

"There is a long tradition of marine rescue service here on the West Coast, and our new name reflects a growing sophistication in the training we provide to our crews, the professional skills they bring to the public, and the amazing capability of the modern rescue vessels that they operate," said Strandt.

The royal title was granted by Queen Elizabeth in February 2012 in recognition of the organization's long-standing service, broad geographic coverage, and philanthropic mandate.