Cycling? Walking? Streetcars? Arbutus Greenway open houses start Saturday

The Greenway is a plan for a walking, biking and — in the future — electric streetcar path from False Creek to the Fraser River, passing through eight different neighbourhood park and community spaces.

'The big goal is to deliver ... a world-class amenity,' city planner says

An artist's impression of what the future Arbutus Greenway could look like at its north end. It includes edible landscaping, long community tables for dining al fresco with neighbours, and a flexible space for pop-up activities. (City of Vancouver)

The City of Vancouver is holding the first of three open houses this weekend on the proposed Arbutus Greenway.

The Greenway is a plan for a walking, biking and — in the future — electric streetcar path from False Creek to the Fraser River, passing through eight different neighbourhood park and community spaces.

"The big goal is to deliver for our residents, and for everyone who wants to visit Vancouver, a world-class amenity," City of Vancouver planner Dale Bracewell told On The Coast host Gloria Macarenko.

"Wider opportunities for people to walk and cycle and the community has some big, bold ideas about public nodes and plazas along the way and some real opportunities to celebrate those unique expanses, oases, mountain views where we can."

The city bought the land, which stretches from Kitsilano to Marpole, from CP Rail in 2016.

That purchase, which cost $55 million, followed much higher demands from the railway as they announced plans to roll trains through the then-unused set of tracks.

Before the purchase, the railway company dismantled long-standing community gardens — to the dismay of some residents.

Last year, the city held public consultations about what the corridor could look like.

The first open house on the Greenway plan is Saturday from 12-3 p.m. at 511 West Broadway.

Listen to the full interview:

The Greenway is a plan for a walking, biking and — in the future — electric streetcar path from False Creek to the Fraser River, passing through eight different neighbourhood park and community spaces. 6:37

With files from CBC Radio One's On The Coast

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