Dutch artist M.C. Escher's mind-boggling drawings have fascinated people around the world for decades, and now a B.C. artist is turning Escher's work into sculptures.

Escher is known for his mind-bending mathematical drawings and wood cuts from the 1930s that show people climbing up staircases on ceilings and other optical illusions. 

M.C. Escher 1

M.C. Escher, The Drowned Cathedral, January 1929, woodcut on laid japan paper, 79.2 x 48.3 cm; image: 72 x 41.6 cm, Gift of George Escher, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia, 1985, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. M.C. Escher's "The Drowned Cathedral" © 2014 The M.C. Escher Company-The Netherlands. All rights reserved. www.mcescher.com, Photo © NGC.

After years of developing a relationship with the Escher Institute in the Netherlands, B.C. gem sculptor Andreas von Zadora-Gerlof and his team will turn 10 of Escher's drawings into large-scale sculptures made out of stainless steel, aluminum and other metals.

Von Zadora-Gerlof said he has admired Escher's works since he was six years old because they're "so amazing and so deep and so visual" that people of any age can find something to delight them.

"If you're the type of person who wants to dig deeper and be amazed by the impossibility of all the angles and mathematics that goes into [Escher's work] and the perfection, that delights you," he told The Early Edition.

"And if you're a child, you're just darn impressed by the idea that (in his work Waterfall) water can fall and also be at the same level and return and fall again."

Von Zadora-Gerlof says one of the pieces he's working on is a 4.5-metre tall sculpture of Möbius Strip II, a drawing of the mathematical symbol for infinity with nine red ants marching around it.

To see a video of Von Zadora-Gerlof working on the sculpture of Möbius Strip II on Youtube, click here.

Von Zadora-Gerlof's work will be exhibited at the event Design Days Dubai, which will take place Mar. 16 to 20 in Dubai.