‚ÄčThe Coombs World Parrot Refuge is underfunded and overrun after its founder Wendy Huntbatch died this past winter leaving workers scrambling to find homes for up to 600 parrots and cockatoos.

For 15 years the refuge in Coombs, B.C. accepted unwanted or abandoned exotic birds, but can no longer.

Coombs World Parrot Refuge John Creviston

John Creviston, a former Calgary zookeeper, has volunteered to find new homes for the hundreds of birds. (Chris Corday/CBC)

Coombs World Parrot Refuge, Parrot with food

After Coombs World Parrot refuge founder Wendy Huntbatch died in February 2016, she left no succession plan or money to keep it going. Food alone is estimated to cost up to $3,000/month. (Chris Corday/CBC)

Coombs World Parrot Refuge Chris Brown Matt Spate

Matt Spate, right, speaking with CBC reporter Chris Brown used to scrub the floors at the Coombs World Parrot Refuge. Now, he's the supervisor. "These birds take a lot of work, a lot of attention. They create a huge mess," he said. (Chris Corday/CBC)

Coombs World Parrot Refuge Matt Spate Eye Injury Ripped Shoulder

Matt Spate, who supervises the Coombs World Parrot Refuge has talon scratches on his face and rips on his shoulder from caring for the birds. (Chris Corday/CBC)

Coombs World Parrot Refuge Mutilated Parrot Refuge

Veterinarians have been trying to help the many birds from World Parrot Refuge who had issues with self-mutilation. (Chris Corday/CBC)

Coombs World Parrot Refuge Red Macaw

The Coombs World Parrot Refuge is trying to connect with former owners of the birds to hopefully get them to take them back. But parrots like these often live up to 80 years, meaning the original owners may no longer be alive. (Chris Corday/CBC)