Adams River sockeye salmon run underway northeast of Kamloops

Every four years millions of bright red sockeye salmon return to the Adams River, near Kamloops, B.C., turning the shallow water crimson with spawning fish.

Millions of bright red sockeye are heading to Roderick Haig Brown Provincial Park to spawn

Sockeye salmon are bright red by the time they reach the spawning grounds of the Adams River near Kamloops, B.C. (Clive Bryson)

Over 200,000 people are expected to turn out over the next three weeks to watch one of the most spectacular displays of natural beauty in the world.

Every four years millions of bright red sockeye salmon return to the Adams River, near Kamloops, B.C., turning the shallow water crimson with spawning fish.

The Adams River sockeye run is the largest in the world. (CBC)

Usually the salmon return during the first three weeks of October with Thanksgiving being the peak weekend.

Jeremy Heighton, the event coordinator with the Adams River Salmon Society, says the salmon were a bit late in arriving, but they are there now.

The 2014 Salute to the Sockeye festival began Friday at Roderick Haig Brown Provincial Park north east of Kamloops.The festival runs until Oct 26.

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