A deadly explosion at the Lakeland sawmill in Prince George, B.C., that killed two workers on Monday is the second deadly accident at a mill in province this year. A similar blast near Burns Lake on January 20 killed two workers. The explosions have prompted the B.C. government to announce all sawmills in the province will be inspected for safety, but forestry is still not the most dangerous sector of work in Canada.

Between 2008 and 2010, there were a total of 2,988 deaths on the job in Canada. Here's a year-by-year breakdown of fatalities in workplaces, according to the Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada (AWCBC).

Total fatalities in the workplace (2008-2010)

2010: 1,014

2009: 939

2008: 1,035

Dangerous industries

These are Canada’s most dangerous industries, based on total fatalities, according to statistics provided by AWCBC.

(Stats are between 2008 and 2010)

Construction

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Damage caused by a partial roof collapse is seen at a downtown Toronto office building on Feb. 29, 2012. The construction industry is the most dangerous in Canada. (Pawel Dwulit/Canadian Press)

  • 700 deaths

The construction industry in Canada is the most deadly in terms of the number of fatalities.

Construction has the highest number of deaths of any industry in Canada, accounting for 23.3 per cent of all workplace fatalities between 2008 and 2010.

The construction industry is defined as businesses involved in constructing, repairing and renovating buildings and engineering works, and in subdividing and developing land.

Province with the most construction related deaths between 2008 and 2010: 

Ontario, 284 deaths (40 per cent of all construction deaths in Canada).

Province with the fewest construction related deaths between 2008 and 2010:

Yukon Territories, 1 death.

Manufacturing

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Jordan McLean attaches exhaust shields to a Camaro at the GM factory in Oshawa, Ontario on Friday, June 10, 2011.

  • 637 deaths

Following in a close second is the manufacturing industry in Canada, which accounts for 21.3 per cent of all workplace fatalities.

The sector is made up of businesses that are involved in the physical or chemical transformation of materials or substances into new products.

Manufacturing establishments include workplaces such as plants, factories or mills.

Province with the most manufacturing related deaths between 2008 and 2010:

Ontario, 359 deaths (56 per cent of all manufacturing deaths in Canada).

Province with the fewest manufacturing related deaths between 2008 and 2010 :

Yukon, Northwest Territories, and PEI had no manufacturing deaths.

Transportation and Storage

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A stolen flatbed truck heads east along the Queen Elizabeth Way in St. Catharines, Ont., Monday, Oct.31, 2011. A police pursuit of a stolen tractor-trailer that played out for hours on live TV has ended.

  • 329 deaths

The industry accounted for 11 per cent of all workplace fatalities in Canada between 2008 and 2010.

The transportation and storage sector includes businesses involved in transporting passengers and goods, warehousing and storing goods, and providing services to these establishments. The modes of transportation are road— which includes trucking, transit and ground passenger — rail, water, air and pipeline.

Province with the most transportation related deaths between 2008 and 2010:

Ontario, 85 deaths (25.8 per cent of all transportation deaths in Canada).

Province with the fewest transportation related deaths between 2008 and 2010:

PEI, 0 deaths.