Canada Post stopped home delivery to 74,000 addresses in 10 communities across the country on Monday, part of the Crown corporation's move to end all urban door-to-door mail service to five million Canadians in five years.

People in the affected areas will have to get mail from their local community mailbox.

Canada Post says it is phasing out home delivery, and cutting thousands of jobs, owing to financial losses stemming from falling mail volume and increasing use of digital communication. The corporation says Canadians mailed almost 1.2 billion fewer pieces of mail in 2013 than they did in 2006.

The addresses affected by today's changes include:

  • 12,500 in Winnipeg.
  • 10,450 in Calgary. 
  • 7,900 in the Ottawa suburb of Kanata.
  • 450 in Fort McMurray, Alta.

In Montreal's North Shore, people living in Repentigny, Rosmère, Lorraine, Charlemagne and Bois-de-Filion are included in today's change.

Canada Post hasn't been open with its employees about the decision-making surrounding the cuts, said Andrew Rosenfeld, a mail carrier in Lachine, Que.
    
"People don't really know what's going to happen, they don't know why it's happening," he said. "They're just not well-enough informed because Canada Post never asked anybody."

Canada Post 201312111

A mail carrier walks in Ottawa in Dec. 2013. Canada Post is beginning to phase out home delivery as it deals with falling mail volume and financial losses. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

In Winnipeg, about 12,400 homes and 70 businesses in the areas covered by postal codes beginning in R2P and R2V are included in the changes. 

Marilyn Loden, a resident of The Maples area of Winnipeg, said she is happy with the change.

"I'm away a lot so I have to get my daughter to come get my mail, where if I have it in a box, then it'll just be there when I get back," she told CBC News.

In Kanata, Ont., where about 500 community mailboxes have been installed, roughly 7,600 households and 300 businesses had their direct delivery service end today. The affected postal codes include K2K, K2L and K2M.  

Last week, the Canadian Union of Postal Workers teamed up with groups representing seniors and the disabled to launch a Federal Court challenge against Canada Post's decision to end home delivery.

The case will argue, in part, that the elimination of mail delivery violates Section 15 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which guarantees equality rights for groups like disabled citizens.

The union placed a community mailbox in front of Parliament Hill on Monday to protest the changes. About a dozen union members attended the protest wearing hats that said Save Canada Post, CBC reporter Judy Trinh said. 

National president Denis Lemelin said the elimination of door-to-door delivery should be debated in Parliament.