Toyota Canada recalls 56,000 Sienna minivans

Toyota Canada said Friday that it is voluntarily recalling 56,211 Sienna minivans from model years 2004-2005 and 2007-2009 because the gear shift lever could slip and be moved out of the park position without depressing the brake pedal and cause the vehicle to roll away.

Gear shift can slip from park position and cause vehicle to roll away

A 2004 Sienna minivan, one of the models that Toyota is recalling because of a problem with the gear shift interlock system that can cause the cars to shift out of the park position and roll away. (John C. Hillery/Reuters)

Toyota Canada said Friday that it is voluntarily recalling  56,211 Sienna minivans from model years 2004-2005 and 2007-2009 because the gear shift lever could slip and be moved out of the park position without depressing the brake pedal and cause the vehicle to roll away.

Normally, a slider and stopper that are part of the shift interlock system prevent the shift lever from moving out of "P" position unless the ignition is on and the brake pedal is depressed.

"Due to either a manufacturing variation in the dimensions of the stopper or the existence of a burr on the slider, there is a possibility that the stopper could be damaged and the shift lever could be moved out of 'P' position without depressing the brake pedal," the company said in a news release.

Vehicle owners will be contacted and told to return their minivans to a dealership to get the faulty component replaced. They can also call 1-888-869-6828 to obtain more information.

The company is also recalling 615,000 Sienna minivans from the same model years in the U.S.

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