Paycheques inched higher in September

The average weekly earnings of the typical Canadian worker ticked up to $918 in September, pretty well flat compared to the previous month but up 1.9 per cent compared to the same month a year earlier.

The average weekly salary rose to $918 in September, flat from August but up 1.9% since last year

Average weekly earnings for salaried workers have ticked slightly higher over the past year. (The Canadian Press)

The average weekly earnings of the typical Canadian worker ticked up to $918 in September, pretty well flat compared to the previous month but up 1.9 per cent compared to the same month a year earlier.

Statistics Canada reported Wednesday that the average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees ticked higher because of a number of factors.

One of them doesn't appear to be the number of hours worked, however, as the average came in at 33 hours a week in September — just slightly below the 33.1 hours seen in the same month in 2012.

People employed in construction saw the highest wage increases, with the average jump being just under seven per cent in the past year.

The average construction worker took in $1,220 a week. That number has been trending consistently higher since September 2011, Statistics Canada says.

Outside of construction, no sector of the economy is seeing wage gains of more than three per cent. In the accommodation and food services industry, wages are actually down by just under one per cent over the past year.

Paycheques were, on average, higher in every single province and territory except Manitoba over the past year, with P.E.I. leading the way at 3.5 per cent growth. In Manitoba, the average was unchanged.

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