Nursing, pharmacy jobs plentiful, but engineers earn more

A new report by Workopolis suggests that nursing and pharmacy students are most likely to land employment in their field after graduation, while engineers earn higher incomes.

Workopolis study suggests studying health care to increase odds of finding a job

If you want to improve your odds of getting a high-paying job after finishing your education, forget that English degree.

A new report by Workopolis suggests that nursing and pharmacy students are most likely to land employment in their field after graduation.

The study, which analyzed more than seven million resumes on the job search website, found that 97 per cent of those who studied nursing, whether it was at the bachelor, masters or PhD level, are working in jobs related to their education.

Other degrees that showed the highest return included pharmacy (94 per cent); computer science (91 per cent); engineering (90 per cent) and human resources (88 per cent).

Although health care jobs may be the most plentiful, the study also looked at data from Statistics Canada and found that engineering jobs were the highest-paying.

Engineering graduates, on average, earned $76,000 as a starting salary, followed by healthcare graduates with $69,600; computer science graduates with $68,000 and law and math graduates with $67,600.

About 90 per cent of those who studied engineering got work in their fields and software engineers earned the most at about $80,000, compared to $73,000 for mechanical or design engineers.

Math grads also came out ahead of those who studied humanities, working in fields such as market research, actuarial analyst, banking consultant and business analyst, with an average pay of $67,600.

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