Heavy truck fuel efficiency must improve by 24%, U.S. says

U.S. regulators on Friday proposed a 24 per cent improvement in fuel efficiency for heavy trucks by 2027 as part of the Obama administration's plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Environmental Protection Agency proposes new rules in bid to cut greenhouse gases

Heavy trucks would have to improve fuel efficiency by 24 per cent under new rules proposed by the EPA. (Associated Press)

U.S. regulators on Friday proposed a 24 per cent improvement in fuel efficiency for heavy trucks by 2027 as part of the Obama administration's plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The Environmental Protection Agency said the new standards for truck tractors would reduce carbon emissions by a total of 1.1 billion tons (1 billion metric tonnes) and begin with model year 2021. The regulators also proposed efficiency standards for trailers.

If adopted by the federal government next year, the regulations would spur technological innovation in the trucking industry, create jobs and lead to a new generation of cleaner, fuel-efficient commercial trucks, officials said.

Canadian fuel efficiency standards commonly fall in line with U.S. proposals.

Full details of the proposals were not immediately available. A source familiar with the matter said a lower efficiency goal of 16 per cent was expected for recreational vehicles and pickup trucks.

New efficiency standards would have a direct bearing on companies involved in truck manufacturing, including Cummins Inc , Eaton Corp, Daimler AG and Volvo AB.

The standards are the latest rule by the Obama administration aimed at slashing greenhouse gas emissions from the country's biggest emitting sectors.

Transportation-related greenhouse gases are the second-largest source of emissions after power plants. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is expected to finalize sweeping greenhouse gas standards for power plants in August.

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