Goods and services spending rose 2% in 2012, says StatsCan

The average Canadian household spent $56,279 on goods and services in 2012, up two per cent from the previous year according to Statistics Canada.

Shelter and healthcare expenses up slightly, transport and food costs flat

Spending on transport in 2012 was 'little changed' from 2011 at $11,216, said Statistics Canada, while food spending dipped less than one percentage point to $7,739, driven largely by a drop in restaurant spending. (Getty Images)

The average Canadian household spent $56,279 on goods and services in 2012, up two per cent from the previous year according to Statistics Canada.

The categories that saw the greatest share of your money — shelter, transportation and food — saw either minor increases over 2011 or remained flat, the agency said Wednesday.

Shelter expenditures — including rent, mortgage payments, repairs and maintenance — were up four per cent to an average of $15,811.  

Expressed in dollars, Albertans spent the most on shelter at $19,309, though B.C. tops the list if expressed as a percentage of the household’s total goods and services spending, at 30.8 per cent.

Shelter expenditures were lowest by both metrics in New Brunswick, at $11,077 and 22.3 per cent.

Spending on transport was “little changed” from 2011 at $11,216, said Statistics Canada, while food spending dipped less than one percentage point to $7,739, driven largely by a drop in restaurant spending.

Households in Alberta again topped the list with an average yearly food bill of $8,414. Nova Scotia came in last at $7,235.

Healthcare spending amounted to a yearly household average of $2,285, though that was up 3.3 per cent from 2011. Those out-of-pocket expenses included insurance premiums and healthcare costs not covered by public or private plans.

Looking beyond goods and services — to include expenses such as income taxes, pension contributions and gifts — the average Canadian household spend $75,443 in 2012, up 2.7 per cent from 2011. 

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