Calgary-based Enbridge Inc. said Wednesday the cleanup from two oil pipeline breaks in the U.S. Midwest over the summer is mostly complete.

At the same time, the pipeline company reported lower profits in its third quarter compared to the same period a year in 2009.

tp-enbridge-mi-cleanup-cp-9542565

Workers tend to turtles in October at an emergency wildlife response centre set erup by Enbridge Inc. in Marshall, Mich. ((Al Goldis/Associated Press))

Enbridge said earnings fell to $157 million, or 42 cents per share, from $304 million, or 83 cents, a year ago.

Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters were on average expecting 47 cents per share.

Revenues were $3.5 billion, compared to $2.6 billion in the year-ago period.

The company said it has met all deadlines set by regulatory officials in Michigan regulators to remove oil in and around the leak site, CEO Pat Daniel told a conference call with analysts and reporters.

"This, of course, does not mean that we're all done," Daniel said, explaining that longer-term monitoring of the spill still remains.

"We will be here until the regulators and local residents are satisfied with our cleanup efforts."

In October, Enbridge reported on efforts at its emergency wildlife response center set up in Marshall, Mich.

Turtles saved

Close to 90 per cent of the 2,300 animals captured and cared for overall since the late July oil spill polluting the Kalamazoo River have been turtles and about 99 per cent of the turtles rescued have survived.

That was a better rate than for birds and other wildlife contaminated by the pollution.

Most of the turtles already have been cleaned, rehabilitated and returned to the wild in time for this winter's hibernation.

The southern Michigan rupture in July spilled millions of litres of crude into the Kalamazoo River.

Less than two months later, another line on the same system leaked a much smaller amount in the Chicago area.

With files from The Canadian Press