Do you like an airy, light-coloured head atop your brew? In the mood for something bitter and delusional? How would you feel about a stout conservative?

If so, a Philadelphia microbrewery may have just what you're looking for with its latest beer offering, aptly named the "Friends Don't Let Friends Vote Drumpf" series.

Dock Street Brewery will soon release a beer named after U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump. But far from being in his honour, the description on the brewery's website makes it clear the brew is poking fun at the man campaigning on a platform of stopping Muslims from entering the U.S. and erecting a giant wall on the Mexican border.

"We're brewing this series to declare our disdain for Drumpf, and to extend a little nod of solidarity to our friends, fans and neighbours that also believe the country deserves better representation," the brewery said, using the Trump family's original German name.

"We just can't wrap our well-coiffed heads around a candidate who encourages his supporters to attack protesters at his rallies, wants to limit access to the U.S. based on religion, and flagrantly manipulates facts and data. Oh yeah, and that ridiculous wall idea? Come on."

The beer hasn't been released yet, but will be a stout, with a 4.5 per cent alcohol by volume. The brewery says it will have the brew on tap at its brewpub, where "guests are encouraged to debate, discuss, and toast to free speech and democracy."

Dock Street says other Trump-inspired beers may follow, but the suds-maker isn't the first to put out an anti-Trump brew. New Zealand brewery Behemoth released their Dump the Trump India pale ale earlier this month, featuring a cartoon of Donald Trump on the bottle.

And Chicago-area brewery 5 Rabbits has also released a Trump-inspired beer called Chinga tu Pelo — a Spanish colloquialism that refers to Trump's hairdo and the brewmaster's suggestion as to what should be done with it.

That beer started out being known as Trump Golden Ale and was served in Trump Tower in Chicago. But that was before the candidate's controversial comments on Mexicans became public.