Canada's richest 1% earned $454,800 average in 2013 and paid $151,900 in tax

Canada's richest one per cent of tax return filers saw their share of the country's total income remain the same in 2013 and their average total income grow by the same amount as everyone else's.

1 per cent of the country earned 10.3 per cent of the income in 2013, same as previous year's level

To be considered among Canada's top one per cent of earners in 2013, you had to take in at least $222,000. (Chris Young/Canadian Press)

Canada's richest one per cent of tax return filers saw their share of the country's total income remain the same in 2013 and their average total income grow by the same amount as everyone else's.

Statistics Canada reported Tuesday that the top one per cent of tax filers received 10.3 per cent of the nation's total income in 2013, the same amount as the previous year.

To be considered in the top one per cent of tax filers, a worker had to earn $222,000 in 2013. That group included 264,030 people across the country.

To be included in the top five per cent, the income cutoff was $115,700, while to be in the top 10 per cent required $89,200.

The average income for a member of Canada's one per cent was $454,800 — an increase of $5,600 compared to the previous year.

The average one percenter paid $151,900 in income taxes that year, an increase of $3,000.

The top one per cent of tax filers paid 20.3 per cent of federal and provincial/territorial income taxes in 2013, unchanged from the previous year.

Women made up 21.9 of Canada's top one per cent of tax filers in 2013, a percentage that has increased for 20 consecutive years.

Across the country:

  • Ontario had the most members of the one per cent at 41.2 per cent of the total, or 108,830 people.
  • Alberta was next at 23.6 per cent.
  • Quebec had 15.5 per cent.
  • British Columbia was at 11.3 per cent.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.