David Desrosiers compares his last 10 years as a member of Simple Plan – touring, performing and recording – to emerging from a powerful storm.

"When you're really in the middle of the whole hurricane, or like tornado, you don't really get to see the big picture until you come out of it," he told CBC News. "[Now] we get to see the big picture, what we accomplished."

The Montreal pop-punk band is celebrating its tenth anniversary with Simple Plan: The Official Story, a new book that looks back on the past 10 stormy years.

A blend of blend scrapbook, biography, personal stories and photographs — some never seen before — the book is a fundraiser for the band’s namesake charity.

The story of the Simple Plan Foundation is just one of the tales the band members enjoy recounting in the book. Though they'd already been donating to charities, they were keen to make a difference in areas important to their fans.

"We try to make it... youth-related. So it talks about poverty, we talk about education, mental illnesses, dependencies, sexual identity — a lot of issues that are not, again as I said, not very glamorous, not discussed very often," said Jeff Stinco.

"Our fans have those preoccupations. They tell us backstage, they tweet about it."

Simple Plan also continues its relationship with fans through tracks like This Song Saved My Life, which is based on tweets sent about troubles they've faced and how the group's songs made a difference to them.

The band talks to CBC’s Alice Hopton about writing This Song Saved My Life and what the 10-year anniversary means for Simple Plan.