It’s time to vote Green, says Nova Scotia leader

The leader Nova Scotia’s Green Party says it’s astounding more people don’t vote for them, despite believing in their values.

John Percy says the party is ‘ready to tackle all the issues’

John Percy announced the Green Party platform Tuesday morning. (CBC)

The leader Nova Scotia’s Green Party says it’s astounding more people don’t vote for them, despite believing in their values.

“It’s a Catch-22 situation,” said John Percy. “People are like, ‘Well, I’m not going to vote for you because you’ll never become government,’ and we’ll never become the government if you don’t start voting for us.”

Percy said the Green Party is ready to teach people how to use efficiencies to save on power. He said Nova Scotia will be better off if it gives municipalities more control over generating electricity.

“We feel that through efficiencies and conservation, that there are far more opportunities to lower power rates than there are by applying freezes or going to the UARB. Conservation is really the key here.”

Percy said he was able to lower his power bill from $229 a month to $155 by unplugging household items he uses on an infrequent basis such as his computer printer.

His goal in this election is to show people alternatives.

“If we can get people talking about what we like to talk about and implement the solutions that we feel are necessary to move this province forward, we consider that a victory as well.”

Percy said they’re not just about the environment.

“We’ve become a party that is ready to tackle all the issues,” he said. “You can’t talk about environment and not talk about jobs. You can’t talk about jobs and not talk about environment.”

Percy said the Green Party intends to run candidates in half the ridings of the 2013 election. 

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