Source: Environment Canada, "Integrated risk assessment for boreal caribou ranges in Canada (Range assessment July 2011; range boundaries update May 2011)

Above is a map of the existing population of boreal woodland caribou across Canada. Interact with the coloured legend boxes to see which parts of Canada are likely or less-likely to be self-sustaining for caribou populations.

The blue highlights show where industry (forestry and/or oil and gas) have made inroads to caribou habitat and the pink highlight the caribou's historic range in Canada.

Federal protection

Woodland caribou are protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). SARA is a framework created to protect and ensure the survival of wildlife species across Canada. The framework decides priority species, how to protect a species, and "identifies ways governments, organizations and individuals can work together, and it establishes penalties for a failure to obey the law."

More about the federal Boreal Caribou Recovery Strategy

The Woodland Caribou, Boreal population was listed as threatened in June 2003 when the Species at Risk Act came into force. The Minister of the Environment prepared the recovery strategy as per section 37 of the Species at Risk Act. The strategy was released on October 5, 2012. It is designed to achieve self-sustaining boreal caribou populations from coast to coast. The scientists appointed to write the strategy determined that for caribou to survive and recover that a minimum of 65 per cent intact habitat was needed. And that's the minimum because even with 65 per cent intact habitat, the caribou only stand a 60 per cent chance of surviving.

See the full report: "Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou, Boreal population (Rangifer tarandus caribou) in Canada"

The Woodland Caribou are found in numerous national parks, where they are protected by the Canada National Parks Act.

Conservation Strategy for Southern Mountain Caribou in Canada's National Parks (pdf)

Alberta protection

Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development, Caribou Management

Government of Alberta: "A Woodland Caribou Policy for Alberta" (PDF 73kb)

Other provincial and territorial recovery strategies

Aside from Alberta, the boreal population of woodland caribou can also be found in the following provinces and territories: British Columbia, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan. According to the federal Species at Risk Public Registry, last updated on August 29, 2012, below is the status of provincial recovery strategies:

British Columbia
"BC Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) - Boreal population"
Status: Preliminary draft received by leads
Number of action plans: 0

Manitoba
"Manitoba's Conservation and Recovery Strategy for Boreal Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou)"
Status: Published by Jurisdiction
Number of action plans: 0

Newfoundland and Labrador
"Recovery Strategy for Three Woodland Caribou Herds (Rangifer tarandus caribou; Boreal population) in Labrador"
Status: Published by Jurisdiction
Number of action plans: 0

Northwest Territories
"Action Plan for Boreal Woodland Caribou Conservation in the NWT"
Status: Published by Jurisdiction
Number of action plans: 0

Ontario
"Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) - Boreal population"
Status: Preliminary draft received by leads
Number of action plans: 0

Quebec
"Recovery Plan for Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Quebec 2005-2012"
Status: Revision received by leads
Number of action plans: 0

Saskatchewan
"Saskatchewan Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) - Boreal Population"
Status: Preliminary draft received by leads
Number of action plans: 0

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