November 2010 Archives

Robert Latimer/Phone in: Car Buying

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Punishment not Justice: The case of Robert Latimer continues to fascinate Canadians. The former Saskatchewan farmer killed his severely disabled daughter in the fall of 1993. He served 7 years in prison for the second degree murder of Tracy. He has been on day parole for three years but has recently been granted full parole. Halifax-based James Lorimer and Company has just published a book on the case. We spoke with Gary Bauslaugh, the author of Robert Latimer, a story of justice and mercy.

Avoiding Lemons: It's one of those big ticket purchases you don't want to mess up but many of us would rather spend time in a dentist's chair than sitting opposite a car salesman. Getting the right advice can save you thousands of dollars and spare you the grief of buying a lemon. George Iny, the president of the Automobile Protection Association offered his advice and took your calls.


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HIV-AIDS Awareness Week: Measuring Progress in the fight against AIDS / Phone In: Stephen Lewis answers your questions about AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


HIV-AIDS: Nearly 30 years into the pandemic, some promising results are surfacing in Africa. Closer to home, the issue seems to be falling off the radar, in schools, and society.
Meet our AIDS panel- three Maritimers who continue to be involved in the fight against AIDS: Christine Porter is Executive Director of the AIDS Coalition of Cape Breton. Debby Warren is the Executive Director of AIDS Moncton. And Tom Hilton is the Executive Director of AIDS PEI.


Phone In: Stephen Lewis joins us, in advance of World AIDS day, to discuss the progress, and failures in the fight against AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa.


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Shipbuilding Boom/Climate Crusader/Phone in: Maritime Wildlife

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


Building for the Future: One of the oldest industries in Nova Scotia is making a comeback. Thirteen hundred people are working fulltime at the Halifax shipyard, and the Irving-owned company is positioning itself to compete to build Canadian ships over the next forty years. As the CBC's Jennifer Henderson tells us, that's good news to a whole new generation of apprentices in trades ranging from electricians to sheet metal workers.

Praying for Change: World leaders, environmentalists and activists will soon gather in Cancun, Mexico, to try, once again, to lay out a plan of action to deal with climate change. Many of those same leaders were at a similar gathering in Copenhagen a year ago. That meeting prompted the former Moderator of the United Church of Canada to launch a very personal campaign to spur leaders into action. Reverend Bill Phipps is still very much in the fight.

Wildlife Stories: Humans aren't the only ones who gear up for winter - it's a busy time for wildlife, as well. Biologist Bob Bancroft anwered all your questions about the wild creatures of the Maritimes.


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So long, Danny Williams / Phone In: Reflecting on Canada's mission in Afghanistan

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

One Heck of a Ride: Premier Danny Williams of Newfoundland and Labrador announced his resignation today in an emotional farewell to his supporters. One week ago, the premier of Nova Scotia was at William's side when they announced the multi-billion dollar Lower Churchill energy deal. Premier Darrell Dexter reflected on the departure of the outspoken politician.

The Training Mission: Canada's commitment to Afghanistan started with a single battalion and a six month tour of duty. Nine years later, the country mourns the deaths of 152 soldiers, and Afghanistan continues to be ripped by violence and riddled with corruption. Earlier this month, Ottawa once again extended Canada's mission. Canadian soldiers will remain there until 2014. They will run training programs centered in the relative safety of Kabul - far from the Khandahar area which has proved so deadly. The international community's goal in Afghanistan is to build a secure, stable and self-sufficient country - one that is no longer a haven for terrorists. Is that goal even achievable? Our guests were Scott Taylor, a former soldier and the publisher of Esprit de Corps magazine, and Ruben Zaiotti, who teaches political science at Dalhousie University, where his main areas of interest include international relations and international security.


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Opportunities for Microbreweries? Phone In: Simon Winchester and Stories of the Atlantic.

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Cheers: The best known brand of beer in Atlantic Canada is moving more of its production down the road. Labatt's, the company that owns the Keith's brand, announced yesterday that it will shift more production to other brewing plants across the country to save on shipping costs.
About 40 people will lose their jobs at the Oland's Brewery plant in Halifax. While Keiths will always be available in the Maritimes, does the move create opportunities for Maritime micro-breweries? We asked Brian Titus, who runs Garrison Brewery in Halifax, and Sean Fraser, who operates PumpHouse Brewery in Moncton.

A Vast Ocean, A Million Stories: It's difficult to comprehend the size and significance of the Atlantic Ocean. It contains one quarter of the Earth's water, and is the source of all life. It's also capable of generating terrible storms that can whip the sea into walls of frenzied water. While there's no doubt the Atlantic is a place of formidable power and wonder, after reading Simon Winchester's new book, you may marvel at why we treat it so badly. Mr Winchester is the author of best sellers like"The Professor and the Madman" and "Krakatoa". His new book " Atlantic" is a sweeping account of the ocean's history. He was our guest, and you told us your stories of the Atlantic.


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A Tasty Show and the Science of Everyday Life

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


Yum, Yum: Each day the approximately 10,000 taste buds in your mouth sort through and react to the variety of food and drink you consume. But what is actually going on, and what's the connection between your brain and your lips, tongue and mouth? Our Science Panel served up a delicious analysis and tasty assessment of our sense of taste. The Science Panel is, of course, Dr Mary Anne White, University Research Professor of Chemistry & Physics at Dalhousie University, and Dr. Richard Wassersug, Professor of Biology, Anatomy & Neurobiology, also at Dalhousie. They also answered all your questions about The Science of Everyday Life.


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Telling Science Stories/ The Car Care Phone In with Doug Bethune

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Telling The Story: The only thing that stands between you and a clear understanding of everything from the lastest medical breakthrough, to the impact of invasive marine species, to global warming, is good reporting. That's why the Science Media Centre of Canada has been established. The independent, non-profit organization hopes to widen the public's understanding of science stories by helping reporters tell them. Its goal is to get journalists quick access to evidence-based research, background information and interviews with scientists. Recently, Maritime Noon attended a public forum in Halifax on the challenges facing journalists and scientists in communicating complex stories. The event was hosted by Jay Ingram of The Daily Planet. The panelists were Pauline Dakin, medical and health reporter for CBC, Concordia University journalism professor Dr David Secko, and Dr Mary Anne White, University Research Professor of Chemistry and Physics at Dalhousie University. Here they are, handling questions from the audience.

On the Phone In: Automotive consultant Doug Bethune answered all your car care questions.


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Premiers' Meet/The Trouble with Billionaires/Our Legislatures/Phone In: Chefs Panel

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

 

Power Politics: Yesterday's mega-deal between Nova Scotia and Newfoundland had premiers Darrell Dexter and David Alward talking today. The hydro electricity Nova Scotia will receive as part of its deal could travel to, or through New Brunswick. But it will take millions to upgrade the transmission system to carry that extra load. We heard from Nova Scotia's Darrell Dexter and New Brunswick's David Alward.

Money Talks: Living in the Maritimes it's hard to under estimate the power and influence of the Irvings. The family's estimated worth of more than 7-billion dollars makes it one of the wealthiest in the country. As rich and as vast as the empire is, the Irvings are just one of 55 individuals or families who are now members of Canada's billionaire club. A decade ago, that exclusive club had half as many members. Turns out the rich really are getting richer. That worries Osgoode Hall tax law professor Neil Brooks. We speak to the co-author of, "The Trouble with Billionaires."

These Old Houses: We chat with James MacNutt, the author of "Building for Democracy, The history and architecture of the legislative buildings of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick."

On the Phone in, Chefs Craig Flinn and Lars Willum offer their holiday menu suggestions and answered all your questions.

 

 


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An Historic Energy Deal/ A Blow for Berwick, NS/ Phone In: veterinarian Dr Eric Carnegy.

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

A Historic Deal: Nova Scotia Power's parent company Emera has agreed to lay an undersea cable to carry hydro electric power from Newfoundland to Nova Scotia and into the power grid that carries electricity to New Brunswick and beyond. It's part of a six billion dollar deal Emera has made with Newfoundland's energy crown corporation, Nalcor. NSP will invest in 20 per cent of the project that's being developed on the Lower Churchill River in Labrador in exchange for 20 per cent of the electricity generated there. We spoke with Rob Bennett, the president of Nova Scotia Power, about the deal.

Out of Work: 280 people who work at a Larsen's meat packing plant in Berwick, Nova Scotia, will lose their jobs when the plant closes next April. The decision is part of Maple Leaf Foods' plan to combine some of its plants, to become more competitive. We heard from Alan Burns, who's worked at Larsen's for 23 years, and, John Prall, the mayor of Berwick, about the economic blow.

A Different Kind of Help:
Former federal politician Flora Macdonald travels regularly to Afghanistan with the group she founded, Future Generations Canada. It focuses on improving the health, education, and economic circumstances of the Afghan people. You reacted to her suggestion that we need to ask the Afghan people how we can help, instead of telling them how to improve their lives.

On the Phone-In, veterinarian Dr Eric Carnegy answered all your pet care questions


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Scientists get Media Savvy/ A Different Approach to Afghanistan/ Phone-in: Art Irwin on Heating with Wood

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Toning-Down the Jargon: We once-again drop into a recent public forum in Halifax called Science and Its Publics. The event marked the Atlantic launch of the Media Science Centre of Canada. That's an independent non-profit organization whose mission is to improve public understanding of science stories by helping Canadian journalists tell those stories.
The Centre provides reporters with evidence-based research, as well as access to background information and scientific spokespeople.
The public forum was chaired by Jay Ingrahm of The Daily Planet.
The panelists included Pauline Dakin, who covers medical and health stories for the CBC;
Dr. David Secko, a scientist who teaches journalism at Concordia University;
And Dr. Mary Anne White, University Research Professor of Chemistry and Physics at Dalhousie - AND of course you know her as one-half of the regular MN science panel.
Dr White began her remarks by talking about the public's insatiable appetite to know more about science.

Don't Tell, Just Ask: The venerable Flora MacDonald shares her approach to working in Afghanistan.
Ms MacDonald was a Progressive Conservative MP in the 70s and 80s, AND one of the first women to run for the leadership of a federal political party in Canada. She was also Canada's first female minister of foreign affairs.
After she left politics: she moved on to international humanitarian work, and founded an organization called Future Generations Canada. Future Generations Canada focuses on improving the health, education, economy, and environment of Afghan people.
Flora MacDonald spoke with Jean LaRoche from her office in Ottawa.

On the Phone-in, heating and ventilation consultant Art Irwin talks about the pros and cons of heating with wood, and answers all your questions about home heating.



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Telling Science Stories/ Phone In: Pain Management

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


Lost in Translation: The need to understand the science behind everything from invasive species to the latest treatment for MS has never been greater. Yet the ability of the media to tell complicated science stories is being compromised by the demands of a 24 hour news cycle, shrinking numbers of newsroom staff, and the fact that few media outlets have the luxury of allowing reporters to specialize in science reporting.
Recently, Maritime Noon attended the Atlantic Canada launch of the Science Media Centre of Canada. The centre is an independent, not for profit organization that hopes to widen the public's understanding of science stories by helping reporters tell them. It's goal is to get journalists quick access to evidence-based research, as much detailed background information they need, and interviews with scientists. Penny Park is the Executive Director of the Science Media Centre of Canada, and she began by setting out the challenges facing the media.

On the Phone In Dr. Mary Lynch, the president of the Canadian Pain Society, and the Director of Research at the Pain Management Unit at the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre in Halifax answered all your questions about pain and pain management.


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The Life of Noah Augustine/ Phone In: Terry Punch and Genealogy

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Death of a Leader: Noah Augustine was a complex man who fought tirelessly for native rights in New Brunswick, but whose life took a serious turn that few people would ever forget. 39-year-old Augustine died in a car crash near Metepenegia First Nation, near Miramichi on Saturday night. He was revered as an activist who first gained national attention by leading the fight for aboriginal logging rights in New Brunswick. We took a look at his life in this documentary by former CBC reporter Melissa Friedman. It first aired in 2004, when Augustine was getting ready to campaign to be chief of his community.

On the Phone In: Terry Punch explained the "cluster" approach for researching your family tree, and he took all your questions about geneaology.
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Your Recommendations for Young Readers

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Recommended Reading: Today, with your help, we built a list of favourite children's books. Our guests were Kathleen Martin, an author and vice-president of the Writers' Federation of Nova Scotia, Mary Ann Gallagher, the owner of Benjamin Books in Rothesay, New Brunswick, and Barb Kissick, a Youth Services Librarian with the public library in Charlottetown. Enjoy!
Picture books:
Willow's Whispers by Lana Button
Scaredy Squirrel by Melanie Watt
Proud as A Peacock, Brave as a Lion by Jane Barclay
Also :
The Bells on Finland Street by Lyn Cook
Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
The Cremation of Sam McGee by Robert Service
Prisoner in a Promised Land by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch, part of the Dear Canada series
Uphome by Shauntay Grant
The Bread Winner by Deborah Ellis
This Side of the Sky by Marie-Francine Hébert
Clever Lazy by Joan Bodgers
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
The Hydrofoil Mystery by Eric Walters
The Silent Observer by Christy MacKinnon
A Northern Nativity by William Kurelek
The Adventures of Jack Lime by James Leck
Lost in the Barrens/Two Against the North by Farley Mowat
Rattled by Lisa Harrington
You Can Pick Me up at Peggy's Cove by Brian Doyle
The Booky series by Beatrice Thurman Hunter
Viola Desmond Won't be Budged by Jody Nyasha Warner & Richard Rudnicki
The Lemonade Parade by Benjamin Brooks
Beautiful Joe by Margaret Marshall Saunders
The Judy Blume series
Our Canadian Girl series
Emily of New Moon by Lucy Maude Montgomery
This Side of the Sky by Marie-Francine Hebert
The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery
Before Green Gables by Budge Wilson
Half Brother by Kenneth Oppel
Pluto's Ghost by Sheree Fitch

Especially for boys:
And Then It Happened by Michael and Laura Wade
Blood and Iron by Lee Heen-Gwong, part of the I Am Canada series
I, Bruno by Caroline Adderson
The Sports Illustrated Book of Hockey
Submarine Outlaw by Philip Roy


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A Day Of Remembrance

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

A Day of Remembrance: At cenotaphs throughout the Maritimes, veterans of Canada's wars past and present were joined by throngs of men and women, Girl Guide and Brownie troops, cadets, and young children holding their parents hands. The CBC's Jack Julian took us to the service at the Cenotaph at the Grand parade in Halifax

We Were Freedom:
More than one million Canadian men and women saw service in the Second World War. When they returned home, some kept their stories and their memories of horror and heartbreak to themselves. But many others were collected by the Historica-Dominion Institute, and have now been published in a collection called "We Were Freedom: Canadian Stories of the Second World War." We spoke with the President of the Institute, Andrew Cohen.

They Die Like Children: Romeo Dallaire is one of Canada's most respected soldiers and human rights activists. In 1994, as head of a vastly inadequate UN peacekeeping force in Rwanda, he witnessed man's capacity to inflict horror and pain. His account of that genocide in his book, "Shake Hands with the Devil", earned him international recognition, and a Governor General's Award. Retired Lieutenant General, and now Canadian Senator, Romeo Dallaire doesn't hide the fact he remains deeply troubled by his inability to prevent the killings in Rwanda. But through that suffering, he has found a new focus, drawing the world's attention to the use of children, as soldiers in theatres of war throughout the world. His new book is called "They Fight like Soldiers, They Die like Children."

On the Phone In : Our guest was Major (Rtd) Tim Dunn, who spent 37 years with the Canadian Armed Forces in a career that took him on peacekeeping missions around the world. We asked you, as you pause to reflect on this day, who do you remember?


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Hot Off the Gaspereau Press/ Commander Josee Kurtz / Astronomy Phone In

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


Hot Off The Press: Good luck getting your hands on Johanna Skibsrud's Giller-prize winning book, The Sentimentalists. The author grew up in Pictou County, Nova Scotia, and almost no one had ever heard of her book before it made the short-list for Canada's most prestigious and richest literary prize. The Sentimentalists was published by Gaspereau Press, a little company tucked away in the Annapolis Valley, and its first print run was only 800 copies. Publisher Andrew Steeves is over the moon about the book's success.

Commander Kurtz: Remembrance Day is a particularly poignant time for military leaders, and a reminder that they are directly responsible for the lives of those under their command. One of those leaders is Josee Kurtz. She's the commander of HMCS Halifax, which is currently undergoing a major refit. And she's the only woman ever to command a naval warship. Commander Kurtz recently joined us for a wide-ranging interview about her responsibilities, her crew's mission this year to Haiti, and what Remembrance Day means to her.

On the phone in, from the aurora borealis to the space station and everything in between, our Astronomy Panel of Dave Lane and Douglas Pitcairn answered all your questions about the night sky.


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Flooded Out/ The Treatment of Veterans/White Poppy Controversy/Phone In: Painting expert, Jim White.

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Flooded Out: It's been a tense 48 hours in south western Nova Scotia, where heavy rain and flooding have forced the evacuation of some homes in the Tusket area of Yarmouth County.
We got an update on the situation from CBC reporter Preston Mulligan.

Damage Control: This past weekend, at rallies across the country, veterans complained bitterly about their treatment at the hands of the Department of Veteran's Affairs.The focus of their unhappiness is the new Veterans' Charter. It was created in 2006, and its critics say it denies vets the guaranteed pensions, family benefits and supports that used to be the norm. The Minister of Veteran's Affairs, Jean Pierre Blackburn, responded to some of the crititcism

White Poppy/Red Poppy: Members of the Prince Edward Island Peace Committee headed to the farmer's market in Charlottetown last Saturday to hand out white poppies, which they consider symbols of peace, and a tribute to civilians who die in war. They were asked to stop. Some people, including Jim Ross, the president of the Royal Canadian Legion on PEI, find the white poppies offensive. But Heidi Verheul disagrees. She's with the Halifax Peace Coalition.

On the Phone In: Jim White sliced and diced all your questions about your painting projects.


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Wet and Wild Weather/Veteran's Protest/Phone In: What Sources do You Trust?

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Wet and Wild: Roads closed, basements flooded - it's been a wild weather weekend in the Maritimes. Southeastern New Brunswick, including Alma, the Moncton area and Saint John were particularly hard hit. In Nova Scotia, some families have been forced out of their homes as water levels rise in the southwestern part of the province. Emergency officials say the worst flooding is in the Argyle area, and in the Annapolis Valley. We got an update from Ramona Jennex, the Minister responsible for the Emergency Management Office in Nova Scotia.

Veterans Protest: Many veterans gathered this weekend at rallies in Fredericton, Charlottetown, Halifax and at other cities in Canada for a first ever Veteran's Day of Protest. It was part of a national effort to bring attention to a long list of grievances against Veteran's Affairs - including pension claw backs, and a reluctance to pay disability and medical benefits. The Federal Minister of Veterans' Affairs has told veterans who have problems to call him directly. But some of the people who were at a rally in Halifax scoffed at that suggestion. They were also critical of both the Veteran's Affairs Department and Stephen Harper's government, but the Royal Canadian Legion also came under fire for its stand on veteran's issues. For a response, we spoke with Pierre Allard, the Legion's Service Bureau Director in Ottawa

Who Do You Trust?: In 2008, the price of oil had surged above $140 a barrel, and experts said it would soon hit $200. A few months later it plunged to $30 a barrel. In 1967, experts predicted that within 20 years, the USSR would have one of the world's fastest-growing economies. But by the year 2000, the USSR no longer existed.
When it comes to predicting everything from the price of oil, to the behaviour of the stock market, so called expert opinion can be dizzyingly wrong. So, how do you assess the information that comes pouring across the web, broadcast media and newspapers? Our guest was Dan Gardener, the author of "Future Babble: Why Expert Predictions Fail - and Why We Believe Them Anyway". Our question: what sources do you trust, and why?


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Empty Nursing Home Beds/ Phone In: Quitting Smoking

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

The Waiting Game: The wait for a nursing home bed to open up is a stressful and emotionally fraught one for an elderly person, and their families. And the wait for some seniors in Nova Scotia is longer than it should be. Officials have discovered that some of those beds are not being filled fast enough, and they want to know why. The health authority on Cape Breton Island has hired an industrial engineer to try to find what's behind the backlog, and the answers may lead to changes throughout the province. We spoke with Keith Menzies, the executive director of the Continuing Care Branch for Nova Scotia's Department of Health.

Butting Out: You see them huddled around the corner of your office building, trying to light up in the wind, or gathered just outside the no smoking zone where the mound of cigarettes butts can be an inch deep. Smoking may be socially unacceptable in many situations, and banned outright in most workplaces, but if you're addicted, it's hard to quit. Our guest was Dan Steeves, a Community Outreach Worker with Addiction Prevention and Treatment Services in the Capital Health District in Nova Scotia. He answered all your questions about quitting smoking.


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Hospital Fundraisers Seek Patient Info/ Midwifery in the Maritimes/ The Baking Phone In with Janice Murray Gill/

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Patiently Raising Funds: Like any other group trying to raise money for a good cause, hospital foundations are continuously seeking out ways to broaden or enhance their fund-raising. In Nova Scotia, the provincial government has received a request from the QE2 Foundation to use patient information to solicit donations. Bruce Marchand is the Vice Chair of the Foundation.

Maritime Midwives: Earlier this week we asked you what reforms you thought would improve the health care system in the Maritimes. Some of you spoke about the need for people to have better access to other health professionals such as dieticians, pharmacists, occupational therapists, and midwives. Midwifery isn't new this region and successive governments have promised, to varying degrees to integrate the practice into the health care system. But advocates say progress has been slow. Christine Saulnier is with the midwifery coalition of Nova Scotia. Susana Rutherford is with a group called Born PEI.

On the Phone In, Janice Murray Gill answered all your baking questions


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Antiquated Liquor Laws/Phone In: Family Law

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Cheers!: If you've ever brought a bottle of wine or a case of beer back across a provincial boundary, you've committed a criminal offence. But you're not about to get hauled in before a judge anytime soon. A federal law that dates from the time of Prohibition attempts to control how alcohol is distributed in this country, but several groups are trying to change that. The CBC's Laura Chapin brought us the story.

All in the Family: Most of us can handle the routine chores in our lives, like paying the bills or raking the leaves. What many of us put off is preparing for life altering events, such as a serious illnesses, a potential divorce, or even death.
Being ready, and planning for those possibilities and eventualities can cushion the blow and save you, and your family, from having to make difficult decisions at a time when many people are overwhelmed with emotion and stress. Our guest was Julia Cornish, with the Dartmouth law firm Sealy Cornish Coulthard., and she answered your questions about family law.


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Delivering health care in the Maritimes - what needs to change?

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Here's to Your Health: Health care expenditures eat up one-third of the budgets of New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. In Nova Scotia, it accounts for 40-percent of all spending. Successive governments have tried to control health care costs, but the best anyone has been able to do is limit the year over year increases in the overall health budget.
Long wait times for high-demand elective surgeries, city emergency rooms packed to the gunnels, regular shutdowns of ERs in hospitals in small rural communties - these are just a few of the problems that plague the health care system. It's a system that's been examined and prodded almost as much as patients themselves.
Dr. Dennis Furlong is a former health minister in New Brunswick, and the author of "Medicare Myths", a book he wrote after leaving politics. Dr Furlong now practices medicine in Dalhousie, New Brunswick. John Ross is an emergency room physician and Nova Scotia's first provincial advisor on Emergency Care. Dr Ross recently released a report on the state of emergency care in that province, which includes significant recommendations for change. We also checked in with the Mayor of Summerside, Prince Edward Island, to find out how that community adjusted after it lost its local emergency room.
We asked: What changes do you want to see in the way health care is delivered in the Maritimes?


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Beavering Away/Regional Energy Opportunties/Phone In: Art Irwin & Home Heating

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Beavering Away: Sure, they're industrious and they may be our national symbol, but beavers can make plenty of trouble for people with all their busy work. And when it comes to maintaining wetlands, Ducks Unlimited says beavers top its list of challenges. Farmers and landowners have their own beefs with beavers, and their dams are a regular threat to roadbeds. In Nova Scotia's King's County, the beaver population is soaring, and that's led to some new alliances. Freelance journalist Dorothy King brought us the story.

A Tale of Two Routes: The President of the Newfoundland power company that's proposing to develop a hydro megaproject on the Lower Churchill River says a co-operative regional approach to energy development will serve the area well. Ed Martin of Nalcor spoke at the annual business outlook conference sponsored by the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council. Nova Scotia and Newfoundland have made a joint application to Ottawa for 375 million dollars to help build an underwater cable that would carry electricity from Newfoundland to Nova Scotia and the rest of the Maritimes. But Newfoundland is also trying to secure an energy transmission route through Quebec. Mr Martin says, given the size of the resources Newfoundland has, it will need both routes.

On the phone in, Art Irwin answered all your questions about bathroom fans, heaters, and keeping your abode ventilated, and snug.


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