August 2010 Archives

Talking warranties

Posted by Jerry West

What happened to David Wilcox on a bus in Lower Sackville on saturday has a lot of people talking about the treatment faced by people with brain injuries.

The Annapolis valley man says he was humiliated by an Acadian Bus Lines driver when he boarded the bus.

He says he was ordered to the back of the bus ... while the driver told other passengers she normally kicks drunks off.

Mr. Wilcox hasn't had a drink in a decade and says he was made to feel like an idiot when he attempted to explain his situation.

This is also familiar ground for our guest, Jake MacDonald. He's a brain injury survivor and president of the Annapolis chapter of the Brain Injury Association of Nova Scotia.

On the phone-in, Doug Bethune answered your calls about automotive repair. 


Click to download podcast

If you make it, will they eat it?

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


Back to school means back to brown-bag lunches. But the most carefully prepared lunch is no good if it doesn't get eaten. So, our nutritionist Mary Sue Waisman answered your questions on making healthy lunches your child will love.


Click to download podcast

Peter Gzowski: A New Biography/ On the Gardening Phone In: Marjorie Willison

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Captain Canada: His voice, and style were unmistakable, and many devoted CBC listeners adored him. The legendary CBC broadcaster Peter Gzowski hosted the national radio show Morningside for 15 years. The hundreds of thousands of Canadians who tuned in each day appreciated his charm, and his gee-shucks style. It masked a razor sharp intelligence, and unsatiable curiosity. But when the microphones were off, a different persona emerged. Gzowski was, at heart, an intensely private man, and all too human. Rae Flemming has explored the private side of Peter Gzowski in a new biography that is sure to outrage some, and intrique others.

On the Phone In, Marjorie Willison joined us to take all your gardening questions


Click to download podcast

What Role Should Governments Play in On-Line Gambling?

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Hedging Their Bets: The on-line gambling business is big money, raking in billions of dollars around the world each year. Many sites are run by private offshore companies.That worries organizations such as the Atlantic Lottery Corporation, which says millions of dollars are leaving this region each year through online gambling. Several provincial governments are trying to get a piece of the action by setting up their own gambling sites. British Columbia got into the game last month. Quebec has announced it will offer online gambling this fall, followed by Ontario in 2012. Here in the Maritimes, the Nova Scotia government is publicly musing about the idea.
Our guest was Dr. John McMullan, a professor of sociology and criminology at Saint Mary's University in Halifax. He's studied gambling advertising and marketing, as well as the link between gambling and crime. Our question: what role do you think governments should play when it comes to on-line gambling?


Click to download podcast

Ticked off: Dr Eric Carnegy and the Pet Phone In

Posted by Jerry West

Check It Out: The warm weather this summer has afforded many Maritimers the chance to go on long walks with their dogs. But sometimes smaller critters also hitch a ride during those outings. Ticks don't just get under our skin, they also like to burrow into dogs' hides. It's just one of the summertime hazards pet owners should be on the lookout for. On the phone-in, Dr. Eric Carnegy answered your questions about keeping your pets healthy and happy.


Click to download podcast

The Key to Caring for Your Piano

Posted by Jerry West

In Tune: They're not portable and can often be expensive, but the piano's versatility has made it one of the world's most familiar and popular musical instruments. From the beat up old upright in the corner of the parlour you remember from your childhood, to the gorgeous baby grand you once had a chance to play, we wanted to hear about the pianos in your life. Our guests were piano tuner extraordinaire Gary Trenholm and music man Bill Stevenson, and they took all your questions about looking after your piano.


Click to download podcast

Flash Flood in Cape Breton/ Overlooked Corners in Genealogy

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Stranded! : For many Maritimers, the past weekend was like most this summer, pleasantly sunny and rain free. But at the northern tip of Cape Breton Island, the story was completely different. The small community of Meat Cove was hit with heavy rain that led to flash flooding. The rush of water washed out several bridges on the only road to the village. Nearly a day and a half later, close to a hundred tourists and locals are still stranded, as engineers try to determine how long it will take to reopen the road. Derrick MacLellan lives in Meat Cove, and guest host Bob Murphy spoke to him from a community centre that is now doubling as a command post.

Overlooked Corners: Some historians believe you can enrich your understanding of the past by actually visiting the places where events unfolded. Terry Punch says that also applies to genealogy, if you're able to visit the homesteads or towns where your ancestors lived, and let your imagination take you on a trip through the years. And, Terry says, wandering through those overlooked corners can provide inspiration in your genealogical search. Terry also answered all your questions about tracing your family tree


Click to download podcast

Paint and Stain Expert Jim White on the Phone In

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

The next time you have a painting project, you might not be able to ask "latex or enamel" ? As oil-based paints go the way of the Dodo, Maritime Noon's paint and stain expert Jim White explained whether today's latex can step into their place. He also answered your questions about using paint or stain.


Click to download podcast

Mailbag: Customers with "issues", proposal for deposits on take-away coffee cups, and Canada Border Services / Phone-in: Janice Murray Gill on pickling

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Having Your Say: Our recent phone-in on the occasionally testy relations between customers and front-line service sector workers ( "Is the customer always right ?" ) prompted a flurry of emails. So did the suggestion from one listener that there be a 10-cent deposit on take-away cups for coffee and tea. And oh, yes - there's the continuing matter of finding out about the way that the Canada Border Services deals with complaints.
Producer Deborah Woolway joined me to read your comments.

In A Pickle: You can almost hear the ripening cucumbers calling to you softly from your back garden and stalls at local farmers' markets. They're saying, "Pickle me ! Pickle me !" And if you don't do something about them soon, those faint cries will start sounding like the drone of vuvuzelas at the World Cup.
But what to pickle, when to pickle, and how to pickle? Whether you're an old hand looking for new recipes, or a novice whose enthusiasm currently outstrips your experience, Janice Murray Gill can help. Janice answered questions about pickling. She also suggested these sites to help you with your pickling : http://pickyourown.org/makingpickles.htm and http://picklesecrets.com/ 


Click to download podcast

International award for animated film by Halifax students on energy conservation / Phone-in : Historians David Frank and Nicole Lang : Labour landmarks of the Maritimes

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

A Bright Idea From Bright Grade 5s: Welcome, pardners, to the tumbleweed-infested Wild West town of Squander. Imagine that it's High Noon - the traditional time for a showdown between good guys and bad guys. But in this movie, the shoot-out is between energy-efficient compact fluorescent lightbulbs, and their sworn enemies, the energy-wasting incandescent bulbs. Who'll survive to light up our lives when the fight's over ?
Well, you'll have to watch the movie to find out click here .
It's called "The Bright, The Bad and the Ugly", and it's the creation of a class of imaginative and hard-working elementary school students from Grosvenor-Wentworth Park School in Halifax. It's also just won first place in the Ottawa International Animation Festival, beating out 70 other entries from around the world - the only grade school class ever to win in the school category. We spoke with teacher Andrew Stickings, who led the class project, and Emma Knapp, one of his students.

Remembering Workers : The folk song "Peter Emberley" - about a young Prince Edward Island man who died from injuries in a New Brunswick logging accident - has endured for more than a century.
But songs are just one way to remind us of sacrifices made by working men and women through our history. And while statues and monuments for the war dead, politicians and industrialists are conspicuous in many Maritime communities, there are also memorials to fishermen, firefighters, miners, port workers, foresters and tradespeople.
As we approach Labour Day, we thought it would be an appropriate time to reflect on these landmarks. Our guests were historians David Frank and Nicole Lang, who've just published "Labour Landmarks in New Brunswick" which documents many of these memorials in their province. We invited you to tell us about labour landmarks in your community.


Click to download podcast

The Choppy Seas of Public Opinion/ Phone In: Is the Customer Always Right?

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Hey There, Sailor! : Our story about an American recreational sailor's encounter with Canada Border Services agents in Nova Scotia has drawn plenty of reaction. Dan Leger, the director of news content for Halifax's Chronicle Herald, recounted the story for us as follows :
The sailor put into port at Canso in July to attend the Stan Rogers Folk Festival. Since there was no customs & immigration agent there to process him, he called the RCMP to let them know of his arrival. The RCMP dropped down and advised him to check in with Canada Border Services when he reached Halifax.
When he did, agents confiscated his boat, and threw gear, food and spare parts around in their search for contraband. Mr Leger says they accused the sailor of consorting with criminals in Vancouver - a port he'd never visited - called him a liar, and threatened him with jail. He had to pay a $ 1000 for for landing at the wrong port and was told he'd have to pay $30,000 a day if he stayed more than 24 hours. Profoundly shaken, he set sail as soon as the wind could take him, vowing never to return. During our interview, Mr Leger roundly criticized Canada Border Services of bullying and intimidation, and noted that every one of the 1400 complaints lodged against the CBS in 2008-2009 were investigated internally - and all were dismissed. (To hear the original interview with Dan Leger, click here.)

Many of you called or emailed us responses and producer Deborah Woolway shared them with us.

Slow News Day?: Maybe. But JetBlue flight attendant Steven Slater rocketed into the lineup in all media last week. The original version of the story was that Slater had been cursed by some passengers when he tried to stop them from taking luggage out of overhead bins before they were supposed to. He then unleashed an obscenity-laced tirade against abusive passengers on the PA, grabbed a couple of beer from the galley, deployed the emergency inflatable slide and slid out of the plane. Those early fragments of the story were enough for many commentators to turn Slater into a mythical figure : the downtrodden servant whose dignity justified his lashing out against the oppression of his masters.
As more details emerge, what happened that day could turn out to be quite different from the original version. But what's significant is how the story became a springboard for a million conversations about the boundaries between a front line worker and a client.
More people are employed in the service sector than ever. Some are better-trained than others, so the quality of service can range from attentive & helpful to passive-aggressive. But customers are more assertive than ever, too, and that can cross the line into abuse. So which principle should govern everyday interactions in retail outlets and restaurants, in supermarkets and in phone exchanges with consumer support representatives ?

Our guest was Len Preeper of Thinkwell Research. He's conducted research for both private & public sector clients. Our question : "Is the customer always right ?"


Click to download podcast

US skipper will never return because of treatment by Canada Border Services / Deposit on coffee and tea containers ? Phone-in: Sound, hearing,and The Science of Everyday Life.

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Welcome to Canada - May We Intimidate And Threaten You ? We Canadians like to congratulate ourselves for having a reputation as a friendly people. But what about the people who represent Canada officially ? Dan Leger, the director of news content for the Chronicle Herald in Halifax, has recounted a story of an American skipper who sailed his 35-foot sloop from the Azores to Canso, Nova Scotia earlier this summer, and who then received abusive and high handed treatment from Canada Border Services.

Coffee, Tea, and a 10 Cent Deposit?: Michael Furlong of Fredericton says it's time to enact a law requiring a deposit on "take-out" coffee, tea and specialty drink cups, whether plastic or cardboard. With concerns about the environment, and the need to reduce government debts, Mr Furlong believes it's an over-looked gold mine of tax revenue. If someone wants to purchase coffee, tea or specialty drinks "to-go", he says there should be a 10 cent deposit on the container, as there is on most other beverages. He says such a deposit would help clean up streets, parks, school gounds, mall parking lots and retail establishments, and that organizations holding bottle drives would also benefit.
What do you think ? Is a deposit on takeout beverage containers an idea whose time has come ?

Listen Up: You know the old riddle : "If a tree falls in the forest and there's nobody there to hear it, does it create a sound ?" The phenomenon of sound and its relationship to our sense of hearing have kept people thinking for centuries.
Sound can used to seduce or to intimidate. Hearing can alert us to danger or to impending pleasure - you know, the kind of excitement you feel when you hear the Maritime Noon theme ? Not a good example ? Well, you probably have one of your own. Our Science Panel of Drs Mary Anne White and Richard Wassersug explained the fascinating crossover between sound and hearing, and they answered your questions about The Science of Everyday Life.


Click to download podcast

How visitors and tourism operators on PEI are coping with this year's crop of mosquitos / Tick removal 101 for humans and pets / Phone-in : Marjorie Willison on gardening

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Buzz Off : They bother, they make a whiny noise, and worst of all - they bite. But if you want to enjoy Maritime summers, you have to learn to live with mosquitos.
For a variety of reasons, it turns out that the National Parks on PEI are an ideal breeding ground for the little biters. Julia Cook wondered if the insects were driving tourists away. So she slapped on the bug repellent and set off to find out.

Beyond A Nuisance : The black-legged tick is a far more serious concern than mosquitos. These ticks can carry Lyme Disease, which can cause a variety of symptoms, starting out with a bull's eye rash. If left untreated, that can proceed to fever, extreme fatigue and depression.
In Nova Scotia, authorities recently identified a fourth area of the province where the ticks are established, in Pictou County. People there have been warned to take precautions when they're outdoors.
In New Brunswick, ticks are also well established in some areas around Saint John, and so far, they haven't yet been a problem yet in Prince Edward Island, where ticks aren't common.
Earlier this week, Nova Scotia's Deputy Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr Maureen Baikie, told us exactly how to remove a black-legged tick. Her clarity was welcomed by Kenson Pennington of Hanwell, New Brunswick, but Jason Maclean of Hubbards, Nova Scotia still had some concerns about how to remove ticks that attach themelves to dogs. To clear up any confusion about the best way to remove ticks from the family pet, we put a call in to veterinarian Dr Eric Carnegy.

Don't Stop Now : There's a fair amount of coaxing that goes on in gardens at this time of year - encouraging words designed to inspire those vegetables to ripen and those late blooming flowers to blossom. And there there are those less kind words for the pests attacking the results of all your nurturing.
Marjorie Willison is the author of The East Coast Gardener, She joined us to answer your gardening questions. We also got advice on how to use Japanese Knotweed.


Click to download podcast

Maritime cyclists want safer roads, more training opportunities / Phone-in: Would you favour year-round education ?

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Who Cares Whether Gas Prices Go Up Or Down ? On Wednesday's show, you shared your favourite rides around the Maritimes - and we heard about some beauties. But many of you expressed concerns about the state of the roads & highways & streets in the region; the concensus among cyclists was that they're somewhere between poor and dangerous. Maritime Noon's producer Deborah Woolway joined me to read some of the many responses we received after the show, including an enlightening description of bike-friendly Denmark.
Then, I spoke with Doug Regular, Vice President of Education, Bicycle Nova Scotia, and a CAN-BIKE National Examiner and Instructor. CAN-BIKE aims to provide cycling courses for all ages - eventually.

The School Year, Re-edited : Students might be wincing at all the Back-To-School ads blossoming around them these days. But would they be happier if the summer vacation were short enough to make those ads unnecessary ?
Some schools in Canada have been piloting so-called "year-round" education. Instead of the current 10 weeks of summer vacation, there are only 4. However, there are more short breaks through the year.
There's research to show that the shorter summer break keeps more students better engaged with learning.
But could this just be the latest of many magic bullets fired at the education system over the years ? There's a perception that core student outcomes - that is, competency in reading, writing, computation & critical thinking - have been sliding, despite much tinkering. On the other hand, could the lengthy summer vacation - a throwback to an era when children were needed to work on the farm - be one of the problems ?
Our question : "Would you favour year-round education ?" Our guest was Annie Kidder, Executive Director of People for Education, a parent-led organization working to support public education in Ontario


Click to download podcast

More collective wisdom as you complete the sentence, "The older I get, the more I realize..." / Phone-in: favourite cycling routes in the Maritimes and advice on improving infrastructure

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Can You Crowdsource Wisdom ? Well, we've been doing it for years on the phone-in, but we tackled it more directly Tuesday when we asked you to complete the following sentence : "The older I get, the more I realize..." Our guests were Lisa Hrabluk & Don Munro and they shared some of the life conclusions they've reached in their mid-40s.
We tapped into a gold mine of nuggets of wisdom - and even mined the lyrics of a Delbert McClinton tune that's comprised entirely of hard-won truths. Don Munro suggested that we play it today. We thought we'd go one better : we found a cover version recorded by the great Etta James when she was 65 and paired it with more life advice we received after the show from wise Maritimers of all ages.

Where The Rubber Hits The Shoulder : Maybe you're a Sunday cyclist with a picnic in the saddle bag and the kids in tow. Perhaps you're an incredibly fit mountain biker who likes to power up hills for the sheer fun of it. Maybe you're involved in a charity bike ride. Or, just maybe, you just want to get where you're going under your own pedal power without getting side swiped and ending up in the ditch.
We asked you to tell us about your favourite bicycle ruides in the Maritimes - urban or rural - and to suggest improvements that would promote cycling in this part of the world.
Our guests were Cynthia Dunsford (a cycling activist who commutes to and from work - which happens to be the Prince Edward Island Legislature, where she represents the riding of Stratford-Kinlock), Mike LeBlanc (who's involved in the Halifax-to-Vancouver charity tandem bike ride called Cyclebetes to raise funds for research into Type One diabetes), and Keith MacCormick, who plies his trade as an emergency room doctor.


Click to download podcast

Not the Kind of BLT You Had in Mind/ The Older I Get, the More I Realize......

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Ticks Spread: Nova Scotia has identified a fourth area of the province where the ticks that carry Lyme disease are established. Dr. Maureen Baikie travelled to Pictou County to warn people they should take precautions to avoid black-legged ticks when they're outdoors. In New Brunswick, these ticks are also well established in some areas near Saint John, but in PEI (where ticks generally aren't common), they haven't presented a problem yet.

Lyme Disease is infectious and can cause a variety of symptoms, starting out with a rash in the shape of a "bull's-eye" which can lead to other symptoms such as fever, fatigue and depression, if left untreated. We spoke with Dr. Maureen Baikie in Pictou.

Words of Wisdom : Acquiring knowledge is one thing. But wisdom - something that grows out of years of observing the tragic, comic and mundane elements of life - wisdom is quite another. The insights that eventually bubble up to top of mind don't necessarily work for anyone else, but they can help guide you through life's ups and downs. And you don't have to be of advanced years to notice recurring patterns in human behaviour - some old souls seem to sort things out pretty early in life. Our guests are keen observers of life - at home, in their communities and in the wider world. Lisa Hrabluk provides professional writing services in Saint John and has been, among many other things, a political columnist. Don Munro is the Producer of Information Morning in Sydney & a quizmaster who's been known to make radio hosts sweat when he tests their knowledge of current events.
So, did you complete the following sentence : "The older I get, the more I realize....".

And if you'd care to share your wisdom, click here.


Click to download podcast

Phone-in - Terry O'Reilly of "The Age of Persuasion" : What's the Most Effective Ad You've Seen Lately ?

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

I'm Not On A Horse: Let's say you have a product that you want to sell. It doesn't matter whether it's new or something that's been around for a long time and lost significant market share - how do you get people at least to think about your product and - ideally - to buy it ? And who's going to do the buying : a man or a woman ?
Well - there are print ads, spots for radio or TV, billboards, the space on the rear end of buses - heck, you can place your ad at eye level above the urinal in men's rooms (which, alas, will not by seen by half the population).
You could use conventional advertising media to direct people to your website for a more personalised interaction.
Or you could tap into social media : YouTube, Facebook and Twitter - and try to connect with people who'll then spread it to their friends. Creating buzz on social media by "going viral" is a recent phenomenon, but ultimately - do the same principles of conventional advertising apply ? Do those amusing videos actually persuade you to part with a buck ? And if they do, is it because the creativity & effectiveness of the pitch was superior ?
Terry O'Reilly has worked through many fads and trends in the advertising world, and he's a keen student of his trade's history & evolution. He's shared insights through his CBC Radio One series "The Age of Persuasion" (to hear past shows, click here ) and through a book of the same name - "a book aimed at the people ads are aimed at".
Terry O'Reilly was our guest as we asked : "What's the most effective ad you've seen lately ?"


Click to download podcast

Phone-in: Veterinarian Helen Douglas - Stories about significant animals in our lives

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

It's Complicated : The relationships we develop with animals can become as nuanced as any human entanglement, with one overwhelming difference : we can decide the fate of the animals in our care. Their habits become part of our routines, and their quirks & behaviour fuel the humourous narrative we share with neighbours and friends.

Throughout human history, animals have been our hunters and labourers. They feed us, they can be our saviours when we get lost and soothing companions.

Sometimes the connection with our pets can be so powerful we'll spend almost any amount of money on expensive foods or high-risk medical procedures to try to keep them alive. And we grieve when they die.
There's a darker side to the relationship, of course - from neglect or abuse of defenceless animals, to using them for profit and gimmicry (like the recent promotional stunt in which a donkey was strapped into a harness and forced to parasail over a Russian beach).
Dr. Helen Douglas has witnessed most aspects of our complicated relationship with animals through a 30-year veterinary career that had its beginnings here in the Maritimes. From treating injured deer to vaccinating feral cats in bags, from calving in manure-filled barns on a frigid winter night to treating spoiled family pets, there isn't much she hasn't experienced.
Dr Douglas has gathered her experiences as a country vet in a book call William's Gift: One Veterinarian's Journey. It combines accounts of learning on the job - by caring for animals both great and small - with an exploration of the emotional connection between humans and the animals with whom we share our lives.

She shared her stories and we heard about animals that loom large in your life


Click to download podcast

ViewPoint Gallery / Halifax

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS


Click to download podcast

Maritime company grows to meet global demand for a particular size of wind turbine / History repeats itself with cheap food imports squeezing out locally-produced items / Phone-in: Advice on solving computer performance problems

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Small But Mighty : When it comes to the wind power industry - that is, companies that build all those turbines - there's a perception that the real action goes on outside the Maritimes. But a regional company has been growing its export trade in a particular wind power niche : the 50-kilowatt turbine that's ideal for rural users, such as farms, fish processing plants and industrial parks.
Seaforth Energy of Dartmouth has just acquired the assets & intellectual property of Entegrity Wind Systems - a firm with operations in PEI and Colorado that went bankrupt last year. Seaforth's president Jonathan Barry told us he feels the acquisition will help his company capitalise on worldwide demand for its turbines.

An Old Story : Many of you seem hungry to talk more about the importance of buying locally-produced food and the frustration of not being able to find it regularly on grocery store shelves. Colin May of Dartmouth sent an email which explains how his genealogical research in England indicated that this was a problem in the 19th century, when cheap imports from the more agriculturally advanced and productive farms of Holland and Denmark affected farmers in the UK. We also read an email from Tom Webb, Program Manager with Co-operatives and Credit Unions in Atlantic Canada and played a call from Kevin Ans of Sussex Corner, New Brunswick.

Floss Your Computer : Is your computer driving you crazy - with pages that load so slowly your coffee is cold by the time you get to the site you want ? That might be symptomatic of a nasty problem. Is it a virus? Or a worm? Or something else? And what's the best way to protect all the information on that hard drive?
Marie Kulbaski, a senior manager with Media Technology Services at CBC Radio provided some high-powered technical help in sorting through common issues that plague your computer.


Click to download podcast

Live from Moncton !

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS


Click to download podcast

Norm Miller of Corridor Resources on pursuing oil and gas in the Gulf of St Lawrence / Frustrations of trying to buy local food / Phone-in: Dave Holland on pest control

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Oil, Gas & Our Gulf : With the Gulf of St Lawrence surrounded by the four Atlantic Provinces and Québec, you can imagine the kind of complications that arise when you talk about developing oil & gas reserves. Exploration there has been stalled, because - unlike Sable off Nova Scotia, or Hibernia off Newfoundland - whatever petroleum lies under the seabed straddles provincial boundary lines. And to make things more difficult, one of the lines is in dispute. But last week, Federal Natural Resources Minister Christian Paradis said there's "momentum" towards an agreement with Québec that could lead to development of oil and gas reserves in a field known as "Old Harry".

 

OldHarry3.jpg

Newfoundland already has such an agreement, and a "site survey" of its side of "Old Harry" will begin next month. Given the bitter relations between Newfoundland & Québec on energy issues, and the dispute over the provincial boundary which cuts through Old Harry, the Gulf is becoming a focal point of political interest. And recently, a coalition of groups from the five provinces called for a moratorium on petroleum development because of the risks to fisheries and tourism.
We spoke with Norman Miller, who's in an interesting position. His company, Halifax-based Corridor Resources (with operations in New Brunswick and PEI), holds licences to pursue exploration on both the Newfoundland and Québec portions of the Old Harry field.
But what do you think of the risks & benefits for provinces that border the Gulf ? Could such an industry coexist safely with fisheries and tourism ? Contact us


Buy Local ? Easier Said Than Done : Last week, a study released by the Ecology Action Centre & the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture showed that the portion of people's food budget spent on local meat, fish, vegetables and fruit has actually declined - from 17% in 1997 to 13% in 2008. Fred Wade, who used to run nine independent supermarkets in the Annapolis Valley has a pretty good idea about at least one of the obstacles to increasing local sales.He told us Tuesday that supermarket managers for the major chains do not have the authority to buy food directly from local producers.
After that interview, several of you wrote and called to tell us about your own surprises trying to buy locally. Maritime Noon's Producer Deborah Woolway joined me to go through the responses.

Pest, Begone : In Hollywood movies they're portrayed as evil creatures which transform into blood-sucking vampires. In reality, they feed on blood-sucking mosquitos. Either way, many a bat can be seen swooping around the stoops and porches of Maritime homes at this time of year. And when that swooping leads to swooning, Dave Holland gets a call. He's with Braemar Pest Control in Halifax. He answered questions about bats and any other perceived pests which might be running, or flying, or crawling around your home.


Click to download podcast

What keeps Maritimers from buying more local food in supermarkets / How George Wendt (Norm from "Cheers") settled on a run of "Hairspray" in Charlottetown / Phone-in: Art Irwin on ventilation, heating & energy conservation

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

The "Choke Point" At Your Supermarket : The old challenge "put your money where your mouth is" seems tailor-made for the issue of Maritime consumers supporting local food producers. Because despite all the talk about the importance of buying locally, a study released by the Ecology Action Centre & the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture last week showed that the portion of people's food budget spent on local meat, fish, vegetables and fruit has actually declined - from 17% in 1997 to 13% in 2008.
It's not clear why that's happened, but Fred Wade has a pretty good idea about one obstacle to increasing local sales.
Mr Wade operated nine independent supermarkets in Annapolis Valley communities before he sold the chain 14 years ago. He now runs a successful pyrotechnics company, Fireworks FX, but he's still keenly interested in the food business.

Where Everybody Knows His Name : American actor George Wendt created the much-loved character Norm Peterson on the long-running TV hit sitcom "Cheers". The deadpan one-liners he fired back to Woody as he arrived for a beer at the legendary bar have become classics.
But are you ready for George Wendt taking to the stage as Edna Turnblad in the Charlottetown Festival's production of Hairspray later this summer ? It's a role he first performed on Broadway in 2007. We reached George Wendt in Charlottetown.

And to re-acquaint yourself with some of those exchanges between Norm & Woody, click here.

It's The Heat...And The Humidity : Many tenants and homeowners in the Maritimes don't have the luxury of air conditioning.
But even without A/C, you can take steps to help you get a good night's sleep, and reduce the mould and mildew problems from moisture that's condensing in all the wrong places.
Energy Consultant Art Irwin returned to answer your questions about beating the summer heat, and making sure your abode is cool, dry and comfortable.


Click to download podcast