July 2010 Archives

Phone-in: Marjorie Willison on herb gardening

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

The Thyme Is Now ! This week's stark warning about the excessive amount of salt in our diet might have the effect of turning more of us into herb gardeners.
Herbs - whether fresh or dry - add flavour to meat, fish, salads and vegetarian dishes, and lessen the need to perk up the tastebuds with a few belts of NaCl.
But even if you already grow herbs, you might be wondering at this point in the season : what the heck do I do with them all ?
Marjorie Willison had advice on managing a herb garden - whether you have one already or you start planning for next year. She's the author of The East Coast Gardener, and she answered your questions about gardens,shrubs, trees or lawns.

 


Click to download podcast

Unanswered questions about the controversial new "liberation" treatment for MS / Feedback on how to encourage more young people to stay and work in the Maritimes / Phone-in: Dan and Darren Steeves answer questions about how to pursue a healthier lifestyle

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

More And Less Than Meets The Eye : Once upon a time, if you played a word association game with Canadians and said "Zamboni", they'd link it to the machine that resurfaces ice in hockey rinks. But these days, the name is also associated with an Italian researcher, Dr. Paolo Zamboni. He developed a procedure for people suffering from Multiple Sclerosis which involves inserting a balloon, which is blown up inside a vein to improve blood-flow to the brain.
There have been public testimonials from some Canadians who've gone to his clinic or to others in Europe and Asia to receive the treatment. And more recently, the discussion has turned political. Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall announced his province is going to fund clinical trials on the treatment, which immediately led to demands that other premiers follow suit.
But aside from a theory, some testimonials, and a hopeful cohort of people with MS, what do we need to find out about the Zamboni procedure ?
Dr Jock Murray is Professor Emeritus at the Dalhousie Medical School and Founder of the Dalhousie MS Research Unit.

Makin' It Work: It might be midsummer - a traditional vacation period - but apparently, many of you are hard at work, discussing...work. It started last week when our phone-in question was "What could Maritime employers do to attract young workers ?"
Wednesday, we played a call to the answering machine from Scott, who used to live in Bridgewater, but worked in Calgary for several years. He's moved back to the Maritimes and now lives in Hantsport and works in Halifax. Scott made several points : first that employers here aren't as welcoming or accomodating as in Calgary; second that the cost of living is higher that the Maritime Provinces admit when they're trying to lure back workers. We read an email from Trevor MacKarney in Dartmouth who's in total agreement, but we also had a call from someone who suggested Scott had made choices which increase his cost of living in the Maritimes.

The Before & After Brothers : You may have heard of The Brothers Karamazov, and you've almost certainly heard of the Blues Brothers, but you've never heard these brothers in action - together.Individually on past phone-ins, they've helped Maritimers make positive lifestyle changes - but from different directions.
Darren Steeves is a fitness expert who works with the Canadian Sport Centre Atlantic & runs his own consulting business, and his brother Dan Steeves works with the Capital Health District in Halifax; he's a community outreach worker with expertise in preventing and treating addictions. They teamed up with advice on how to get past obstacles that keep you from taking more responsibility for your health - such as quitting smoking or starting an exercise program.


Click to download podcast

Neglect charges in NB highlight need for better federal animal welfare legislation / Comments on urban truck traffic, new labour market realities / Phone-in: Terry Punch on genealogy and the census

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Protecting Those Who Can't Speak For Themselves: Two sisters living in New Brunswick have been charged with failure to provide adequate food, shelter and veterinary care for 38 horses. The charges against Sandra and Beverly Tomalin were laid Tuesday under the New Brunswick SPCA Act. A year ago, the sisters were banned from ever owning or caring for dogs in Ontario after they pleaded guilty to one count each of failing to provide care for their animals. The Ontario SPCA said at the time that more than 100 dogs were seized.
But in both of these cases, charges were laid under provincial acts. There is animal cruelty legislation in the federal Criminal Code, but as Dr Alice Crook explained, it's widely seen as ineffective. Dr Crook is co-ordinator of the Sir James Dunn Animal Welfare Centre at the Atlantic Veterinary College in Charlottetown, and a past member of the Animal Welfare Committee of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association. It's worked for years to toughen federal animal welfare legislation.

Trucks and Jobs: On Tuesday's show, we heard about a clash between the past and the present. Christopher Hume, who writes on urban issues for the Toronto Star, told us he was astounded to see huge container trucks rumbling back and forth along the narrow Victorian-era streets of downtown Halifax. He thinks this makes a significant part of the city uninviting for people and business, and can't understand why there wasn't - or isn't - better planning to deal with the truck traffic generated by the location of the container port. We heard one idea for tackling the problem.
You want to continue a conversation that began on a phone-in last week. It was about how to bridge the disconnect between Maritime employers and recent community college & university grads entering the labour market. We played your latest calls.

The Way We Were: Ever since Canada started keeping census records in 1871, it's provided a snapshot in time, placing people and family members in a definite place and context. Census data can be a genealogist's best friend, and help unlock family stories when other sources have disappeared or are non-existent. Terry Punch explained how to compare one census with another to unlock family secrets. He also had tips on tracking down information about ancestors.



Click to download podcast

Urban affairs reporter: Why allow container trucks on Victorian-era streets in Halifax ? A Fredericton nurse returns from working with malnourished children and their mothers in India / Phone-in: Cancer diagnosis and treatment

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Wrong Place, Wrong Time: The Maritimes boast some of the oldest incorporated cities in the country. And part of that legacy is blocks of Victorian architecture in city centres - the kind of buildings which tell visitors, "You're not in Mississauga any more".
And while the businesses in those downtown buildings have continued to evolve, something else hasn't : the streets, which in many cases, come in pre-Victorian widths with no room for expansion. That's fine for a horse & cart, but what happens to businesses and customers when a substantial part of traffic is comprised of large trucks ?
Christopher Hume writes on Urban Affairs for the Toronto Star, and on his most recent visit to Halifax, he was struck by something he hasn't seen in other older urban cores.
If you want to read his more detailed report on the effects of truck traffic on downtown Halifax, click here.
What are your thoughts on this ? Is traffic where you live manageable, or is there so much that it makes the area unattractive as a place to shop or work ? Call our answering machine: 1-800-565-5463.

Malnutrition Hotspot: Working with Doctors Without Borders was always a dream for Anne MacKinnon of Fredericton. With her children grown up, and the encouragement of a supportive spouse, she leapt at the opportunity to put her nursing skills to work with the humanitarian agency. They sent her to Bihar, India, a state where problems of poverty and malnutrition have been pervasive for so many generations that they're almost "invisible".
Anne just returned from that 6-month assignment with Doctors Without Borders, and joined us from Fredericton to tell us about her work.
To see the striking documentary "Invisible", created by the VII Photo Agency's Stephanie Simpson to illustrate efforts to combat malnutrition among families in Bihar, click here .

What Helps On The Cancer Journey ? During his 20-year career as a radiation oncologist, Dr Rob Rutledge has gained a great appreciation of the effect of a cancer diagnosis - not just on patients, but on the people who love and care for them.
He's concluded that science, wisdom and compassion are all linked in the medical, psychological and spiritual journey taken by cancer patients and their families.
Dr Rutledge specializes in breast, prostate and pediatric cancer, and teaches at Dalhousie University. He's also co-author - with psychotherapist Timothy Walker - of The Healing Circle. Dr Rutledge joined us to answer questions about the diagnosis and treatment of cancer...and, we'd like to know what's helped you most in dealing with cancer ?


Click to download podcast

Moncton memories of the World Track and Field Championships / Why young Maritimers leave for jobs and what employers could do to make it more attractive to stay / Phone-in: how to manage a woodlot

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Knocking It Out Of The...Stadium ? By all accounts, Moncton hosted a successful IAAF Track and Field Championships that brought together the best 19-and-under athletes in the world. Together with 1700 volunteers and overwhelming community support, the local organizing committee pulled off the largest sporting event ever held in Atlantic Canada
The CBC's Michael R LeBlanc spent much of the week at the glittering new stadium on the Université de Moncton campus and prepared a soundscape.
The President of the local organizing committee for Moncton 2010, Larry Nelson, says the 2010 IAAF Games have changed Moncton forever. The question now is - how best to use the stadium? It will host more track competitions later this summer, and a CFL game this fall, but will it have a continuing presence in Maritime track and field ?
Last week on Maritime Noon we explored what was available for track and field athletes in the rest of the region, and how the existing (or non-existent) facilities affect athletic development. Afterwards,we heard a blunt assessment from a listener in part of the region that could use better athletic infrastructure.

Going Down The Road, 2.0 : We all know how important it is for partners in a relationship to understand each other's needs and aspirations. That also applies in the labour market. The expectations of someone leaving community college or university in search of work and the expectations of an employer can often be wildly out-of-whack, and - just as in personal relationships - that's not good for either party.
It's especially important to sort out those matters in this region, because young grads with student loans are quick to pack up and leave for greener pastures when they can't find what they're looking for here. And with a rapidly aging labour force, that makes it all the harder for Maritime business operators to fill jobs.
Last week on the phone-in, we explored what's often a generational gap when we asked : "What should Maritime employers do to attract younger workers ?". Today, we played some of the responses to our answering machine after the show.

A Woodlot Is More Than Trees : The type and number of trees harvested or planted, along with the amount of thinning, has consequences for the animals and plants that populate our woodlands. It also affects the air we breathe, erosion, and the appearance of the landscape. We were joined by three guests who are well-acquainted with our region's wooded areas. Andrew Fedora is a forest technologist and executive director of the Federation of Nova Scotia Woodland Owners. Ken Hardie is manager of the New Brunswick Federation of Woodlot Owners & director of the Southern New Brunswick Forest Products Marketing Board. And, from Orwell, Prince Edward Island, we were joined by Gary Schneider - supervisor of the MacPhail Woods Ecological Forestry Project and co-chair of the Environmental Coalition of PEI. They answered your questions on how best to manage a woodlot.


Click to download podcast

Aside from Moncton, where can Maritime track and field athletes find decent facilities ? / A world "first" for NB as Amber Alerts move onto Facebook / Phone-in: Questions about The Science of Everyday Life

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Every Second Counts: An "Amber Alert" is designed to mobilise a community to look for a missing child - whether the child has wandered away from the backyard or been abducted.
Since time is of the essence, authorities have tried to find ways to communicate Amber Alerts as quickly as possible. But one of the biggest networks, which delivers a larger audience than radio or TV, has been inaccessible - at least until now.
Corporal Todd Chadwick of the Miramichi Police Force told us how municipal and RCMP forces in New Brunswick became the first in the world to make an arrangement with Facebook to use the popular social network for Amber Alerts. To sign up, click here .


Nowhere To Run ? It's a blustery, rain-soaked day at the Moncton stadium where Canada is playing host to the World Junior Track and Field championships. But the track itself looks great, and long after this competition is over, the city will have an enviable facility where the next generation of javelin throwers, hurdlers, and sprinters can train and compete. 
But  what's available for track and field athletes in the rest of the Maritimes? And what's the connection between facilities and athletic performance ? The CBC's Melissa Friedman set out to find out.

Higher ? Faster ? Stronger ? But By How Much ? : In sports, they say records are made to be broken. But looking at the sports featured at the World Junior Track and Field Championships, is there an upper limit to how quickly a runner can complete a marathon, how far an athlete can put a shot, or how high a person can jump ? How much do materials - from the track surface to the javelin - affect results ?
These are the sorts of things scientists have explored for years. Dr Mary Anne White & Dr Richard Wassersug talked about the interesection of high performance sports and scientific research. But they also answered questions about The Science of Everyday Life. Mary Anne is University Research Professor of Chemistry & Physics at Dalhousie University. Richard is Professor of biology, anatomy & neurobiology at Dal.


Click to download podcast

Mihira Lakshman on Maritime hopes at the Junior World Track and Field Championships / Tintype tale / Phone-in: What should Maritime employers do to attract younger workers ?

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Humidex of 27 And 24 Laps To Go : The pace is blistering and so is the track. Hot, humid weather is playing a role at the World Junior Track and Field Championships in Moncton. It's great for athletes in certain events - not so much for others.
From high in the stands, with an eagle eye view of competition,the CBC's Mihira Lakshman has been setting Personal Bests all week, blogging and reporting on the international event.

Bad News/Good News: Yesterday, Rosemary Beckett joined us to talk about antiques and collectibles and mentioned the best way to clean silver : in a word - gently - without abrasive materials. That reminded photographer Peter Barss of West Dublin, Nova Scotia of a job he was once asked to do, and couldn't. He writes: "A customer had tried to clean an old tintype, a beautiful and rare family photo from the 1800s. She tried to clean off a couple of spots, and with one swipe of a soft cloth she wiped off two faces. She asked if there was any way to restore the image. Nope... and tintypes don't have negatives. No reprints."
That's a sad story. And here's one that could have been.
In the early 1970s, Peter spent a year and a half documenting the lives of the fishermen in Lunenburg County. His photographs and interviews became a national bestselling book, Images of Lunenburg County , and images and text from the book toured Canada, the USA and UK. But in 1987, when the Barss family was away, their house burned to the ground. All the negatives and taped interviews from the project were lost. But this story - unlike the tintype one - has a happy ending. The Nova Scotia Museum owned the only extant complete set of prints of Peter's work, and lent them to Craig Yorke at Image House, who converted them to digital files. Now, the works that formed the basis of Images of Lunenburg County, are on display once again. You can see them at the Anderson Gallery in Lunenburg until August 4.

You're The Boss Of Me ? When it comes to the current job market, there's more to it than the basic equation of supply and demand : X number of jobs and Y number of qualified workers. These days, there are often big gaps in expectations between the person hiring and the jopb applicant. And we're not talking about stereotypes : you know - the unreasonable manager who wants more credentials and experience than any twenty-something could hope to have and the twenty-something who wants to work from a coffee shop with a laptop all day.
But the workplace dynamics of 2010 doen't resemble what you see on the TV series Mad Men. The pecking order isn't what it used to be. Technology doesn't tie people to an office desk for 8 hours a day, but it can enable the job to pursue employees anywhere 24/7. And while money is important, workers might value certain types of compensation more highly than the weekly wage.
But when employers and employees don't agree on mutual goals, you see workplace turnover, which is costly - whether it's in the private or public sector. And it's not like we have lots of time to figure this out. Baby Boomers are retiring, there's a shrinking population entering the workforce and younger Maritimers with student loans to pay off are as likely to pursue jobs in Alberta or Abu Dhabi as they are in their home provinces.
We asked : What should Maritime employers do to attract younger workers ? Our guests were Vinod Rajasekaran (author of The Road To Retention, a study for the Public Policy Forum) and Sarah Craig (Employment Coordinator with the Faculty of Business at UNBSJ).


Click to download podcast

Meet an international journalist (and some excited visting fans) at the World Junior Track and Field Championships / Phone-in: Rosemary Beckett on antiques and collectibles

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

All Roads Lead To Moncton: They're away to the races at the World Junior Track and Field championships - the biggest sporting event ever hosted in the Maritimes. Fifteen hundred athletes from more than 170 countries, an army of volunteers, and a state-of-the-art new stadium at l'Universite de Moncton all add up to an extraordinary international spectacle.
There are seven Maritime athletes at the Games. Tuesday morning, 19-year old Genevieve Lalonde of Moncton thrilled a hometown crowd and set a new Canadian national junior record in her heat of the 3000m steeplechase event. She now advances to the final, scheduled for Thursday at 7:30 (in the relative cool of the evening). Her Maritime teammate Mattias Wolter of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, competes in a heat of the men's 3000m steeplechase on Friday. Meanwhile, Chelsea Whelan of Liverpool competed in a tough field in women's shot put on Tuesday and did not advance.
Track and field in Europe and other parts of the world attracts much more coverage than it does in Canada, and there's a large contingent of international sports media in Moncton. Anja Herrlitz is a sportswriter in her native Germany, and she spoke with the CBC's Michael Richard LeBlanc about the importance of these championships. Michael also interviewed some very excited visitors who'd travlled a long way to see the events.

More Than A Hobby: Rosemary Beckett isn't just a collector : she's a collector of collections. Over the years on the phone-in, she's brought in - and described - many items from her treasure trove on every imaginable theme : Hallowe'en, kitchen utensils, Victoriana, vacation postcards - you name it.
Rosemary is a frequent guest at regional antiques roadshows and she returned to answer your questions about antiques and collectibles, but also to talk about collecting - which can range from a hobby to a compulsion.


Click to download podcast

Could move towards earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer's have unintended consequences ? Phone-in: Dr Kenneth Rockwood on Alzheimer's and other varieties of dementia

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Is Earlier Necessarily Better ? We all know that you can't begin medical treatment until you get a diagnosis. And in many cases, the sooner you get the correct diagnosis, the better your chances of either curing or delaying the progress of the disease.
But will the dynamics that work for the early diagnosis of things like diabetes and certain forms of cancer apply for Alzheimer's Disease ?
Last Tuesday, at an international meeting in Hawaii, a panel convened by two American bodies - the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association - proposed new guidelines which would include diagnosis of "pre-clinical disease" - that is, using so-called "biomarker" tests like MRIs, brain scans or spinal taps to see if you have signs of Alzheimer's before any of the common symptoms show up.
But if those criteria are adopted, what would that mean for someone in, say, his or her 40s ? What if you got a false positive ? How would it affect your ability to get insurance or qualify for worker's compensation ?
Those are just some of the questions raised by this proposal.
Dr Ken Rockwood has treated more than 3000 persons with various forms of dementia and worked with their care givers and family members. He joined us to discuss the proposed changes and to answer questions about Alzheimer's and other varieties of dementia. He's a Professor of Geriatric Medicine & Neurology at the Dalhousie Medical School, the Kathryn Allen Weldon Professor of Alzheimer Research, and President and Chief Scientific Officer of DementiaGuide Inc.


Maritime Noon is Moncton-bound : From Kenya and Spain to Jamaica and Germany, the best 19-and-under track and field athletes on the planet are in New Brunswick this week. The next time you see many of them, they'll be competing in the 2012 Olympics in London. But now, all that talent - including seven athletes from the Maritimes - is on display at the IAAF World Junior Championships
Throughout the week, CBC Radio will provide coverage of the Games - and that includes Maritime Noon.
This Friday, we'll be downtown, broadcasting live between 12 and 1 from Mexicali Rosa's near the City of Moncton's festival tent. If you're in the area, drop in and say hello, meet some of our Maritime athletes, coaches and volunteers, and groove to the Latin-infused vibe of Eschucha, our house band.
CBC Reporter (and runner) Mihira Lakshman will update us on results from the competition site.
So join us in person at Mexicali Rosa's (at the corner of Main & Botsford) or tune in : this Friday, July 23rd.


Click to download podcast

Your thoughts on the future of the forest industry / Phone-in : Marjorie Willison returns to answer your questions about gardens and lawns

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Seeing The Forest For The Trees : There are few topics we deal with on Maritime Noon which ignite as much passionate debate as how to manage and care for our forests.
On Thursday, we spoke with two players in Nova Scotia who approach the issue from vastly different perspectives.
Raymond Plourde is the Wilderness Co-ordinator with the Ecology Action Centre. He said he supports a set of recommendations now before Nova Scotia's Minister of Natural Resources. Two out of three members on a government committee have recommended tight restrictions on clear cutting, whole tree harvesting, and the use of herbicides.
But Steve Talbot of the Forest Products Association of Nova Scotia told us that adopting the recommendations would take away tools the industry is now permitted to use. He wants the recommendations re-examined, and FPANS has launched what it calls an "awareness campaign" among its 700 members - who range from from large pulp companies to small woodlot owners - urging them to contact the minister and convince him to reject the recommendations.
Those interviews prompted many calls and emails, and producer Deborah Woolway joined me to share them with you.

The Midsummer Surge: This is the time of year when the garden can get completely out of control. A few days of rain give your flowers, vegetables and lawn much-needed moisture. But when the sun returns, you can be faced with an explosion - not just of the plants themselves, but new pests, more weeds, mould and mushy blossoms to deadhead.
In case you're feeling overwhelmed, Marjorie Willison (author of The East Coast Gardener) joined us to help relieve your anxietites and suggest priorities that'll help ease you through the rest of the gardening season.


Click to download podcast

The battle for hearts and minds on the future of forestry heats up / Phone-in: Duff Conacher, head of "Democracy Watch" : What would improve the health of democracy in Canada ?

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Not Out Of The Woods Yet : When is a clearcut not a clear cut ? Is the use of herbicides justified if it means protecting an industry that's worth billions ? Those are some of the high stakes questions at the core of a serious difference of opinion about the future management of the forest industry.
In Nova Scotia, two out of three members on a government committee recommended tight restrictions on clear cutting, whole tree harvesting, and the use of herbicides.[To read the conflicting views of the panelists, click here. ]
The Forest Products Association of Nova Scotia, however, says that would take away some of the tools the industry is now permitted to use, and wants the recommendations re-examined. It's launched what it calls an "awareness campaign" among its 700 members - who range from from large pulp companies to small woodlot owners. It's encouraging them to write to the Minister of Natural Resources urging him to reject the recommendations.
We heard from Raymond Plourde, Wilderness Co-ordinator with the Ecology Action Centre (who calls the campaign classic scaremongering) and Steve Talbot, Executive Director of the Forest Products Association of Nova Scotia.


They Call It Democracy: Every generation of movers & shakers knows the principles you must support - loudly and publicly - if you want to be accepted as a leader...the so-called "Mom & Apple Pie" principles which no right-thinking person would argue against. "Justice" and "Fairness" and "Good Governance" used to be in vogue. But these days, candidates for everything from municipal council to the Prime Minister's job or the CEO's position in a major corporation are just wild about "transparency" and "accountability".
Since 1993, Duff Conacher has measured this rhetoric against actual behaviour and deeds. His non-profit, non-partisan organization, "Democracy Watch" says it's dedicated to "Cleaning up and making governments and corporations more accountable to you, and making Canada the world's leading democracy!" Mr Conacher has announced that he'll be stepping down within the year.
He claims success in a variety of Democracy Watch's campaigns - more than 100 changes in federal laws and policies addressing bank accountability, government ethics, honesty in politics, money in politics, open government, and corporate responsibility, and changes to provincial laws on political finance limits and lobbyist disclosure.
But we all know cases in which the "transparency and accountability" mantra has not translated into action. So what would bring actions into line with promises from political and corporate leaders ? What would remove unnecessary secrecy from government ? What would ensure that ethical standards are adequate and enforced ?
Duff Conacher was our guest as we asked : What would improve the health of democracy in Canada ?


Click to download podcast

Health implications for babies who aren't weaned from the bottle after 15 months / Money-losing Co-Op Atlantic store looks to other successful turnarounds in the region for inspiration / Phone-in : Jim White on using paints and stains

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Suck It Up...But Not For Too Long : Having a baby immediately triggers a whole new set of decisions. And making the best decision for your baby now doesn't mean it'll still be good six months from now.
Take the decision of when to wean the baby - specifically, when to wean the baby who's bottle-fed. A study published this week in the Journal "Pediatrics" indicated that intervention by a health care professional can help parents decide to wean their infants from the bottle at about 15 months. The reason for this deadline is that prolonged bottle feeding can actually lead to health problems.
Dr Robin Walker is a Pediatrician and the Vice President of Medicine at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax. He's also a regular guest on our phone-in. He explained the health consequences of prolonged bottle-feeding.

Use It Or Lose It : That could be the message that members of the Co-op Atlantic store in West Saint John hear at upcoming meetings. For the past few years, the store has struggled with operating losses, and now faces possible closure.
But according to the Public Affairs Manager for Co-op Atlantic, the general health of its retail stores in the region appears to be good. We contacted Romeo Cormier in Moncton to find out what's challenging outlets like the one in West Saint John and what's helping others thrive.

Our Brush With Greatness : It's a rare week on Maritime Noon when we don't get a call or email from a listener asking how they can get hold Jim White. He operates Lake City Paint and XXL Painting in Dartmouth and he returned with advice on any project involving paint or stain. He also explained how to select the right brush for those projects.


Click to download podcast

Phone-in: Jim Lindner with advice on saving personal audio-visual materials and migrating them to digital formats

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Time Is NOT On Your Side : No matter how much you cherish that audio cassette of grandmother reminiscing about life on the farm, the photo slides of that once-in-a-lifetime trip, or the VHS of your baby's first steps, Father Time is not a sentimental person.
The actual materials used to record those important moments can literally turn flaky over the years. And beyond that, the devices used to play them back aren't exactly filling the store shelves.
But how can you save those audio-visual gems from the pre-digital age for your own enjoyment and for future generations looking for a link with the past ?
Jim Lindner pioneered techniques now commonly used for videotape restoration, and he's overseen the video restoration of such collections as the NBC News Archive, The Library of Congress, The Metropolitan Opera, and The Andy Warhol Foundation. When he's not summering in the Maritimes, he works with Media Matters in New York.
Jim answered questions about how to preserve your personal audio-visual treasures, transfer them to digital formats, and back them up.


Click to download podcast

Stranded cows and flooded roads in NS/NB border area / Ottawa's decision to drop mandatory long-form census could eliminate best source of unbiased information / Phone-in: Doug Bethune on automotive problems

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

How Now, Wet Cow? Highway shoulder washouts, road closures, and bellowing cows in water up to their bellies : it's been quite a weekend in the Amherst area. It was drenched in 43 millimitres of rain on Sunday with more in the forecast. Some roads in Cumberland County have been closed, and RCMP are warning drivers to be careful. The CBC's Kevin Harvey told us what he'd seen - including a herd of stranded cattle.

If You Don't Feel Like It, Don't Bother : As a citizen of Canada, you want to believe that you count in the eyes of your government. But what if your government loses interest in counting you ?
The next Canadian census will still include the short-form questionnaire about gender, age, marital status & the relationships of people in your home. But the mandatory long-form survey - with about 50 questions - will no longer be required of 20% of households. Instead, Ottawa will send out the long-form to more people, but make the act of completing it voluntary.
The decision didn't come from Statistics Canada - it was political (Industry Minister Tony Clement said some people simply don't like filling out long census forms). But what will it mean if Ottawa no longer gets solid data on education, employment, income, ethnicity & language ? Rosella Melanson, Executive Director of the New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women, told us what we'll lose if the government doesn't collect solid data.

Driving In The Damp: It's been a wet, soggy few days in much of the Maritimes. And whether you're running errands across town or making plans to haul a boat trailer loaded to the gunnels to your favourite lake, driving in the rain presents challenges.
Doug Bethune explained why you should never use cruise control when it's raining and shared other tips for safe wet-weather driving. He also answered your automotive questions.


Click to download podcast

Shunning our Shorelines?/ Thoughts on a Culture of Peace/ Hiking Phone In

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Anchors Away: If you're a passenger on a cruise ship, lounging by the pool and sipping on a coconut drink with one of those little umbrellas - you're probably NOT preoccupied by what type of fuel is propelling your boat. But some cruise ship companies are threatening to stay away from North American ports - including those in the Maritimes - once new fuel regulations come into effect in 2012. The new rules would mean a 3.5 percent reduction in the amount of sulphur allowed in fuel when cruise ships or cargo vessels are anywhere within 200 nautical miles of North American shorelines. Port Authorities throughout the region are keeping a close eye on the developments. One of them is Captain John McCann, the director of operations and harbourmaster with the Saint John Port Authority.

Give It A Chance: Yesterday on Maritime Noon, we asked you for ideas about how to build a culture of peace. Our guests were Alyn Ware, a New Zealander who's been awarded the "alternate" Nobel prize for his on-going work on disarmament and peace issues, and River Smith, a young activist who helped organize a peace conference this week at Mount Saint Vincent University. After the phone in we heard from Dr John Leblanc, a pediatrician at the IWK and an associate professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at Dalhousie.

Have Boots Will Hike: When the sun is shining it's tempting just to head to the beach and soak up the rays. But if you're looking for shade or a little exercise, the long daylight hours make it a perfect time to take a hike. Our guests were Michael Haynes, the author of several books about hiking trails in Nova Scotia, Paul Gaudet who writes a hiking column for the Moncton Times-Transcript, and Tom Connor, a dedicated explorer of the trails of PEI. You called in with your suggestions.


Click to download podcast

Speak Up for Yourself with Voice Prints/ Cyrus Eaton's Legacy/ Phone In: How to Create a Culture of Peace

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Listen Up: Police investigators have used fingerprints for decades to identify people. And now you can buy laptop computers which require an impression of your fingerprint instead of a password to access the hard drive. But what about "voiceprints"? It turns out your voice pattern is as unique as your fingerprint pattern. And more companies are using voices as security features. Reporter Melissa Friedman shared her recent encounters with the technology

Cyrus Eaton's Legacy: In 1957, industrialist Cyrus Eaton brought together leaders and thinkers from around the world to his hometown of Pugwash to discuss the threat of nuclear war. That conference led to the creation of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs. For decades, the Pugwash Conferences have brought together policy makers, scientists, and public figures to seek ways to eliminate nulcear weapons, and reduce the threat of war. The Pugwash movement was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1995. And the place where it all started - The Thinkers' Lodge - is now undergoing a restoration. Reporter Vanessa Blanch went there recently and met Cyrus Eaton's grandson, John. John Eaton lives in California, where he runs a technology company, but he chairs the Pugwash Parks Commission, which owns and cares for the Lodge.

Creating a Culture of Peace: We're fortunate to live in this part of the the world. Despite a steady diet of news reports that focus on shootings and stabbings and beatings, statistics show that violent crime in this region and this country has actually been on a steady decline for years. But we're not immune to the violence that is so widespread around the world. Military communities across the region have witnessed first-hand the deadly price of the war in Afghanistan. And, at times, our downtowns, our classrooms, and our communities have been rocked by violence. This week, Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax is hosting a peace conference called Being the Change. We invited two of the participants into the studio for the phone in. Alyn Ware is the co-ordinator of New Zealand Peace Education, and involved with Parliamentarians for Non-Proliferation and Disarmament. He played a key role in the decision reached by the International Court of Justice to declare nuclear weapons illegal. In 2009, he received the Right Livelihood Award - also known as the "alternate" Nobel Peace Prize. River Smith is youth participant at the conference, and a recent graduate of the Peace and Conflict Studies program at Mount Saint Vincent. Our question: what's the best way to create a culture of peace?


Click to download podcast

Bob Bancroft Health Update/ Eel River Bar dam opens/ Children's health

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Bob Bancroft: A few weeks ago, Maritime Noon received some news that really threw us for a loop - our long-time wildlife expert - and long-time friend - Bob Bancroft had been diagnosed with lung cancer. Bob's wife Alice said he was putting a halt to his many extracurricular commitments - and concentrating on getting better. Now, while Bob's not out of the woods yet, he does not have lung cancer, and we're happy to share that he's received some qualified positive news.

Opening the Flood Gates: The First Nation community of Eel River Bar in northern New Brunswick celebrated this week as the gates to the dam on the river that flows through their community were opened permanently. It's the first step in the restoration of the river. Now, work to dismantle the dam will begin - and the entire structure will be removed within a year. The CBC's Alison Northcott got an update from band councillor Gordon Labillois.

Happy and Healthy: Whether you run a summer day camp for kids - or are a full-time Mum or Dad - you get used to dealing with skinned knees, bug bites, and runny noses. But sometimes the injury can't be soothed with a SpiderMan band-aid and a popsicle. Luckily, we know one pediatrician who makes house calls - at least house calls to Maritime Noon! Dr Robin Walker is vice-president of medicine at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax. He answered your questions about keeping your children healthy. He also passed along several links that deal specifically with Lyme Disease in children:


Click to download podcast

Cool Tunes, Hot Jazz

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


May We Take Your Order? Jazz had its roots in the nightclubs of Chicago and New Orleans in the early 20th Century. But the genre isn't easily defined, and 100 years later, it encompasses everything from swing to scat, Dixieland to gospel, and even hip hop. The Halifax Jazz Festival is just around the corner, so we invited Pat Watson, who's with the Nova Gospel Ensemble, Dani Oore, a saxophonist, improviser, and composer, and jazz vocalist Daniel Matto into the Maritime Noon Jazz Cafe. Our question: what's the jazz tune that means the most to you?

Listen to the Jazz Fest Phone In


Click to download podcast

Nursing Our Nurseries/ Phone In: Art Irwin on Heating and Ventilation.

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Nursing Our Nurseries: As many a green-thumbed gardener knows, the season to plant flowers and prune shrubs - and launch night attacks on big fat slugs - can be strikingly short here in the Maritimes. That means that local nursery owners have only a few months to eke out a living. Aside from the short season, they also have to compete with the garden centres that sprout-up like spring tulips in the parking lots of grocery stores & big-box outlets everywhere. And that makes it difficult for some smaller-scale nursery owners to survive. Bob Osborne owns Corn Hill Nursery, outside Petitcodiac, New Brunswick, and Paul Grimm owns Springvale Nurseries, which is about to close its Garden Centre in Berwick, Nova Scotia. They spoke with last week's guest host, Jean Laroche

Cool and Snug: This is a great time of year to just kick back and forgo the chores. After all, Maritimers live for our all too brief summer. But if you invest a little time - at least planning those odd jobs - it will be worth your while. Art Irwin operates Irwin Energy Consulting Services in Halifax. He answered your questions on heating and ventilation.


Click to download podcast

Something's buggin' Marjorie

Posted by Jerry West

Bees are all the buzz in Caribou, Nova Scotia. Hear why...
 
And, on the phone-in: Marjorie Willison was here to talk about all the creepy crawlies that are eating our greenery. She also answered your gardening questions.
Click to download podcast