June 2010 Archives

The Band of America's Few/ Phone In: Preserving Jams and Jellies with Ellie Topp

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Stepping Out: Military bands from around the world will take the stage in Halifax tomorrow to perform at the official opening of the Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo. Most of those bands are tightly-knit groups who have been working on their routines for months. But one band met for the first time exactly one week ago. Its 56 members have never practiced together before, but they intend to perform with nothing less than military precision. The Band of America's Few is composed of retired U.S. Marine Corps musicians. They came to Halifax from as far away as Virginia and Hawaii, all for the love of playing together again. Freelance reporter Shaina Luck brings us the story of the first American band to visit the Tattoo in 14 years.

Must be Jelly: We're in prime strawberry season, and cartons of ruby red juicy goodness are spilling from roadside stands and super market shelves. Blueberries and blackberries aren't that far behind. Those berries are great fresh - add a little cream or even better - some whipped cream and a shortbread bisquit , and you officially arrive at a slice of heaven. But it's alway nice to enjoy nature's bounty out of season. Ellie Topp is the co-author of the Complete Book of Year-Round Small Batch Preserving, and you called her with all your questions about jams and jellies.


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Blueberries, bees, Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo, and automobile financing

Posted by Jonathan DeRouchie

Find out why the world of science is a-buzz about the effect blueberry fields can have on wild bees.

And you've seen the show, now you can buy the book. We spoke with a woman who helped put together a coffee table-sized book about the Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo.

And, on the phone-in:  Looking to buy or lease a car? Lured by the incentives but confused by all those financing options. George Iny of the Automobile Protection Association was here to offer his expert advice.



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The Queen visits Halifax and the costs of higher education

Posted by Jonathan DeRouchie

We heard from a Mi'Kmaq poet who was getting ready to read for the Queen
And we heard your thoughts on the cost of higher education  
And, on the phone-in, Terry Punch was here to talk about the influence of royalty on our given names, and to answer all your questions about your family tree.



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Tidal Power Setbacks Par for the Course/Phone In: BBQing

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Down but Far From Out: The news that Irving Oil has abandoned its research into tidal power in the Bay of Fundy sent a ripple through the Maritimes. Irving says that its decision was "due to policy concerns and uncertainty around the viability of tidal technologies". It comes just weeks after Nova Scotia's efforts to test the strength of those tides hit a major snag. A test turbine lost two blades and the companies involved are planning to raise it some time this fall to try and determine what went wrong.
These are setbacks for an industry in its infancy in this region, but it's not that unusual according to Chris Campbell, the Executive Director of the Ocean Renewable Energy Group.

Grease that Grill!: The hardier souls among us like to barbeque year-round, but summer is prime grilling season. Sometimes it's as simple as picking up a steak and slapping that bad-boy on the grill. A little spice rub or marinade can add flavour or transform a cheaper cut of meat into a tender and juicy meal.
But if you really want to turn it up a notch - there are cooking techniques that can make your next BBQ truly spectacular. Our Chef panel was Lars Willum, who runs a catering company called Cape Breton Gourmet, and Jesse Vergen, the executive chef at the Saint John Ale House.


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Tidal Power Ebbs and Flows in the Bay of Fundy/ Phone In: Is Technology bringing us closer togather or driving us farther apart?

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Ebb and Flow: The surging tides of the Bay of Fundy have the potential to provide massive amounts of power - if only they could be harnessed. On both sides of the Bay environmentalists and industrialists look at the churning waters and contemplate the possibilities and the challenges. And they are considerable. A test turbine placed on the Nova Scotia side near Minas Basin has been damaged - and will be pulled up later this fall in an attempt to analyse what went wrong. And in New Brunswick, Irving Oil has quietly walked away from the tidal research project that was announced with great fanfare only two years ago. We spoke with the CBC's Bobbi-Jean MacKinnon for an update on the situation in New Brunswick. Afterwards, Nova Scotia's Minister of Energy Bill Estabrooks told us that his province remains committed to the development of tidal power in the Bay of Fundy.

Tweet This, Text That: Internet social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and You Tube have a tremendous capacity to connect us in ways no-one even thought possible a decade ago. But is all the time we spend online or texting or trading e-mails coming at a price? Can an "I-heart-you" message with smiley face really replace time spent together? There's no question we're better connected technologically. The world-wide-web makes it possible to hook up with family or friends or reconnect with long-lost classmates at the click of a mouse. But that ease and speed is also changing the nature of our contact. Why take the time to compose a a letter when you can blast off an email or use the phone. Why email or phone when you can text? Our guest was psychologist Dr Stacey MacKinnon from the University of Prince Edward Island. Our question: Is technology pulling us together or driving us farther apart?


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The Cost of a University Education/ Cruising on the Hanseatic/Pet Care Phone In

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY


Counting the Cost: The latest survey of Maritime University graduates includes sobering news for those who want to further their education. Most students who got an undergraduate degree in 2003 went on to get a second degree in order to help them get a job. And that extra university time had to be financed by an ever-gowing debt. We spoke with Mireille Duguay, who's with the Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission.

Anchors Away: The Hanseatic is a German-owned expedition cruise ship that caters to passengers from around the world. It recently completed a cruise in Atlantic Canadian waters, including a full circumnavigation of Newfoundland. Travel writer John Nowlan signed up for the trip, and once he got his land legs back he joined us to share details of the trip. Check out his pictures in our photo gallery.

Pet Care: It's a scene that plays out every year at this time. Firefighters or police are called in to rescue a pet - usually a dog - that's been locked inside a parked car that's rapidly heating up in the summer sun. The excuse from the embarrassed owner is just as predictable. "I was only gone a minute", "I left the window open a crack" , "I didn't know it would get so hot so fast!" Dr Eric Carnegy set us straight on the dangers of leaving your pet in a vehicle, and answered your questions about keeping your pets healthy and happy.


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The Case of the Exploding Wine/ Investing in the Past to Forge a Future/ What Makes a Great Workplace?

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Unlucky Seven: The Nova Scotia winery Benjamin Bridge has been enjoying year over year success with its white wine Nova 7. Two years ago, the Gaspereau Valley winery described its product as "nothing short of spectacular". Today, some of it been pulled off the shelves - a company recall prompted by concerns about the possibility some bottles may explode because of problems with the fermentation process. We spoke with Peter Gamble, a winery consultant who's been working with Benjamin Bridge.

Investing in the Past: Coastal communities throughout Atlantic Canada have faced major challenges since the demise of the traditional fishery. In remote Battle Harbour, just off Labrador's south coast, cod was king for close to 200 years. But after the decline of the inshore fishery in the 1960's, that community's permanent residents were relocated. Today, the Battle Harbour Historic Trust has brought the isolated village and its salt fish heritage back to life as a tourist attraction. Travel writer John Nowlan was there recently, and spoke with theTrust's director, Gordon Slade.

Building a Better Workplace: When you wake up in the morning are you ready and raring to head into work? Is the place where you spend at least eight hours a day one where creative ideas flourish and co-workers like and respect each other? Do you and your colleagues work towards clear and common goals?
Many workplaces set objectives about making their company a great place to work. But how do you make that objective meaningful, and how do you measure that laudable goal? We asked you to reflect on the great and the gruesome places where you've toiled, and share your observations about what made them so successful, or, a tough slog. Our guest was psychologist Dr Michael Leiter. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Occupational Health at Acadia University, and runs an organizational consulting firm whose goal is to enhance the quality of worklife. Our question: what makes a great workplace?


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A Tribute to Irwin Barker/A Celebration of Adult Learners/ The Renovations Phone In.

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

A Comic's Comic:Canadian comedian and comedy writer Irwin Barker has died. Although he lived in Toronto, he had roots in the Maritimes, and was well known here. Irwin was a contributor on the CBC TV program "This Hour has 22 minutes, and performed at the Halifax Comedy Festival. When he was diagnosed with a fatal form of cancer three years ago, he joked that his doctor had given him 12 months to live but that his lawyer "was working on getting it down to eight". His fight with cancer was the subject of a documentary called "That's My Time, " and he kept performing throughout his illness with his trademark understated and self-deprecating humour. Guest host Jean Laroche spoke with stand up comedian Mark Farrell about his friend and colleague.

Something to Celebrate: When Wilma Huffman's children started school, she wanted to be able to help them with their homework as they grew older. But, like many other Maritimers, Wilma had never finished high school, and she knew she needed help with her reading and math skills One day she walked through the doors at her local Learning Network, and took the first step to a high school diploma. This past weekend, Wilma and more than a hundred other people were honoured as part of the Nova Scotia's first celebration of adult learners, held in Wolfville. It was organized by the Association of Nova Scotia Community Learning Organizations, which is made of up local literacy groups offering free programs throughout the province. Freelance reporter Philip Moscovitch was at the celebration, and brought us the story.

The Renovations Phone In: Now that summer is officially here - it's time to get busy with all those renovations you've been putting off. After all, that leaky roof isn't going to fix itself, is it? This may even be the year you finally build that dream deck you've always wanted. But before you grabbed a hammer and started pounding nails - you put your questions to Sydney-based contractor Alan Keating.


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Mail call ! Your thoughts on the "time crunch" and securing a safe supply of fresh water / Phone-in: Dr Nick Giacomantonio answers questions about preventing or managing heart disease and strokes

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

When To Call 9-1-1: Having a stroke is a medical emergency. But recognizing and responding quickly to warning signs can significantly improve your ability to survive it, and aid in recovery.
If the stroke has been caused by a blood clot, then doctors can administer a clot-busting drug - but that's only effective within a few crucial hours after symptoms present themselves.
That's why it's critical to recognize the 5 warning signs of stroke and call 9-1-1.
But despite all the information available on heart disease and strokes, it doesn't register for many men and women until they wake up in hospital - if they're lucky. For survivors, there's a new world of medical intervention and lifestyle change.
Dr Nick Giacomantonio is a cardiologist at the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre in Halifax. He told us about the warning signs of stroke and answered your questions about preventing or managing heart disease and strokes.


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As tensions escalate on the Korean Peninsula, Ted Barris revisits the stories of Canadians who fought in the Korean War / Bell Aliant's explanation for sky-high executive salaries / Phone-in: Your recommendations for summer reading

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Back to the Future ? In the strongest language it's used to date, North Korea says it will respond "with military force" if the United Nations attempts to punish it for what it calls a "fabricated accusation" that it attacked and sank a South Korean vessel in March. An international investigation has concluded that the North sank the corvette, killing 46 sailors.
The sabre-rattling has focused attention on a long-standing antagonism whose genesis many Canadians don't know much about : the Korean War of 1950-1953.
For Maritimers like Don Fleiger of Saint John, though, that war was all too real. Historian Ted Barris has documented the contribution of veterans like Mr. Fleiger and the legacy of that war in his book Deadlock in Korea. It's been re-released to mark the 60th anniversary of the Korean War.

 

We're In The Wrong Jobs: Hey, when the show is on, it's lunch time in the Maritimes. Have you earned your $5000 yet ?
Probably not - unless you're a top corporate executive.
But how much is too much and how much is just right when it comes to salaries for that class ? That question was raised at the annual meeting of BellAliant in Halifax on Wednesday. The company's Chief Operating Officer, Karen Sheriff, was paid $2.8 million in salary and performance bonuses last year.
Bill Gorman is a BellAliant unit-holder who worked out Ms Sheriff's salary to about $10,000 per working day and concluded ("Nothing personal", he clarified) that she's overpaid. Mr Gorman told Siim Vanaselja, Chair of the Board of Trustees for the company's Income Trust Fund, that he thought they could offer less and still attract competent managers.
We heard Mr Vanaselja's explanation.

So Many Books, And Finally, Some Time: There are some book reviewers with the power to make writers and publishers quiver in fear. A withering review can scare away potential readers and divert that first printing straight to the remainder bins. But a positive review can send readers to bookstores and to online sellers in droves. Ultimately, though, those make-or-break reviews are just one person's opinion.
We invited you to become part of a swarm of reviewers - someone who wants to share your literary finds with fellow readers around the Maritimes. Our guests were Christine McLean (who teaches journalism at St Thomas University and will be hosting Information Morning in Fredericton for part of the summer), Laurie Brinklow (publisher of Acorn Press on Prince Edward Island), and Sue Goyette (who's on the Faculty of Creative Writing at Dalhousie University. Her poetry collections include The True Names of Birds and Undone; she's written the novel Lures, and Sue also won the 2008 CBC Literary Award for her poem "Outskirts").

Here's a list of books mentioned:

Galore - Michael Crummey
The Book of Negroes - Lawrence Hill
The Law of Dreams - Peter Behrens
Murderland (Part 1) - Garrett Cook
Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Defoe
A Walk in the Woods - Bill Bryson
Three Cups of Tea (and sequel, Stones into Schools) - Greg Mortenson
Come Thou, Tortoise - Jessica Grant
Look Out - John Steffler
Pigeon - Karen Solie
Olive Kitteridge - Elizabeth Strout
Good to A Fault - Marina Endicott
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society - Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows
Three Day Road - Joseph Boyden
Why Your World is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller: Oil and the End of Globalization - Jeff Rubin
World War Z - Max Brooks
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (the Millenium series) - Stieg Larsson
The Failure Of Global Capitalism: From Cape Breton To Colombia And Beyond - Gary Leech
The Fall - Albert Camus
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
Gardens of the Moon - Steve Erickson
Loose Pearls and Other Stories - DC Troicuk
The Thirteenth Tale - Diane Setterfield
The Birth House Ami McKay
Thank You for Coming - Mara Altman
A Forest for Calum - Frank MacDonald
Fionavar Tapestry - Guy Gavriel Kay



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Political Dustup in New Brunwick/ Phone In: The Time Crunch

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Behind the Photo-Op: Every now and then, the backdrop behind the exquisitely-crafted political photo-op is raised and the public gets to see the workings of the party machinery. And that seems to be the case with a split between Federal Tories in New Brunswick. Greg Thompson stepped down as the Minister of Veterans' Affairs in January and announced he wouldn't re-offer in the next election. He had a reputation as a MP who worked cooperatively with the provincial premier in New Brunswick, regardless of political affiliation. But this week, he went public because of what he sees as political interference by Keith Ashfield - a fellow Tory and his successor as Regional Minister for the province.
What raised Mr Thompson's ire was an email he obtained recently, written by Mr Ashfield's chief of staff, Fred Nott, regarding a funding application for infrastructure in the village of St. George, which is in Mr Thompson's constitutency. The email from Mr Nott states : "My opinion - put everything on hold in that riding until there is a nominated federal candidate, and preferably until after Sept. 27." That's the date of the provincial election. And no Conservative candidate has been chosen to run in Mr Thompson's riding in the next federal election.
After Mr Thompson spoke with Mr Ashfield this week about the email, he told the Telegraph-Journal that his successor stated, 'We're not going to be carrying the province on our backs to the next election.' The CBC's Jacques Poitras contacted Keith Ashfield and asked if any federal projects were being held up - either because of the provincial election or because the Conservatives haven't yet chosen a candidate in Mr Thompson's riding.
By the way, one of the people interested in running for the Tory nomination in Greg Thompson's constituency is John Williamson, a close friend and long-time communications adviser to Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Run Ragged: As you collapse into bed every night, are your last conscious thoughts about what you didn't manage to get done that day ? Or are they about all the things you'll have to do tomorrow when you wake up after not getting enough sleep ?
The mind and body have their limits, and the Canadian Index of Wellbeing's latest report suggests too many of us are pushing them to the brink. In the words of the CIW's chair, Roy Romanow, "People are struggling to meet the competing demands of a workplace that can reach out to them 24/7, caring for children and aging parents, and their own need to refresh body and mind. As individuals and as a society we are paying a steep price for this time crunch. We're less healthy, both physically and mentally and we have less time for leisure and relaxation with family."
Well, if you're time-crunched person, you might hear that and start feeling guilty about not spending enough time relaxing with your family. The demands of family - perhaps a couple of generations at once - are joined by demands of the workplace and community organizations that need your help as a volunteer. And try as you might, balance - a balance that includes time to genuinely relax and enjoy life - is proving elusive. Our guest was Lynne Slotek. She's National Director of the Canadian Index of Wellbeing, an independent, non-partisan organization whose mission is to report on the quality of life of Canadians, and promote a dialogue on how to improve it through policies based on evidence. Our question: "What would help you get out of the time crunch ?" To read a summary of the CIW report, click here.]


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Who's in Charge Here?/ Phone in on Protecting Fresh Water Resources.

Posted by DEBORAH M WOOLWAY

Nobody Asked Me: Actually, the government of Canada didn't ask anyone whether they could spend a billion dollars on the upcoming political summits in Ontario.
Which raises the question - who makes the decisions these days - and where does the real power lie in Canada? With a political leader? A bureaucrat? A company CEO? That was the focus of a recent phone in with Donald Savoie. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Public Administration & Governance at l'Université de Moncton. Dr Savoie is the author of several books on the changing patterns of influence that shape our society - most recently, one with a blunt title : "Power : Where Is It ?" We read your emails and played some of your responses.

Water Water Everywhere: We know that water is essential for the health and well-being of people and the natural environment - in short, for life itself.
But collectively, we show a remarkable disregard for its protection and conservation. Most Canadians would be hard pressed to tell you how much water they use on a daily basis, exactly where it comes from, or how much there is. That's perhaps understandable in a country marked by rivers and lakes refreshed by rain and snow. But in fact, Canadians' per household consumption of fresh water is among the highest in the world. At the same time, we're putting increasing pressure on those water resources. We're expanding our cities further into rural areas. Our forestry, farming and industrial practices - combined with the potential effects of climate change - add to the risks. From shale gas exploration in New Brunswick, to threats to ground water in Prince Edward Island, and the drilled or dug wells which 40% of Nova Scotians rely on for drinking water, the stressors are growing and the issues are complex.
On the Phone In our guests were Stephanie Merrill, the Co-ordinator of the Freshwater Protection Program with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Jocelyn Rankin, the Water Co-ordinator with the Ecology Action Centre in Halifax, and Dr Michael van den Heuvel, the Canada Research Chair in Watershed Ecological Integrity at the University of Prince Edward Island. Our question: What's the best way to protect our fresh water resources?


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More Maritime volunteers needed for major regional study on cancer rates / Phone-in : Your thoughts on effects of English becoming the global language

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Get Out The Toe Nail Clippers: It's something you'll never see trumpeted in a tourism ad for Atlantic Canada : "We have the highest cancer rates in Canada !" But it's a sad truth that we have to face, attempt to understand and try to change.
That's why the Atlantic Path was launched - an ambitious multi-year study which hopes to enlist the help of 30,000 Atlantic Canadians in discovering why our cancer rates are so high.
The study began in Nova Scotia, but it's now expanding throughout the region. And Dr Louise Parker wants to recruit you.
Dr Parker is the Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Population Cancer Research at Dalhousie University. She heads the Atlantic Path : Partnership for Tomorrow's Health. She brought us up to date on the study.
And if you want information on how to become a volunteer in the study - clip a few toenails, answer a few questions to help researchers understand why cancer rates in the region are the highest in Canada - click here.

Frankenstein or Friendly Giant ? How would you feel to learn there's something that's "contagious and adaptable" circulating through human populations ? Politically, how do you deal with a force that's "populist and subversive" ?
We're not talking about a scary new virus or a new insurgency, but rather a word coined by a French writer in 1995 : "Globish".
Robert McCrum thought that word was a perfectly good title for his new book "Globish : How The English Language Became the World's Language". Mr. McCrum has retraced the roots of English, but also the many modern hybrids blossoming around the world - hybrids which allow someone at a call centre in Bangalore, India to sort out your computer problems at 2 in the morning, or diplomats in Morocco & Spain - who don't speak each other's languages - to de-escalate a crisis while communicating with an American mediator in English.
The ascendancy of English can make someone born Anglophone feel at least lucky, and perhaps smug. Why learn any other languages if everyone in the world is learning mine ? And think of all the Maritime college grads paying off their student loans by teaching English in South Korea or Japan. On the other hand, that rising tide of English-speakers means that if there's a job which doesn't require you to be in a particular place - say, sweeping the street in your hometown - it might be more advantageous for an employer to outsource it to Singapore or China.
Robert McCrum was our guest as we asked for your thoughts on the consequences of English becoming the global language.


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Fire destroys the legion branch in Oromocto and a chapter in the history of local veterans / Forget swings and monkey bars - Dartmouth kids get a nature-inspired playground / Phone-in : Marjorie Willison answers gardening questions

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Irreplaceable : Hearts are heavy in Oromocto. An overnight fire destroyed the local branch of the Royal Canadian Legion - a fire the RCMP deem "suspicious".
The CBC's Angela Chang reached Harold Perrin, a Korean War vet, and president of Branch 93.

Having Fun, Naturally: Think back to the adventures you had as a kid, playing with friends outdoors. Chances are, the best fun happened - not in a paved schoolyard or a rock-strewn lot - but in natural settings.
A dusty playground on a busy Darmouth street is about to be transformed into the kind of inspiring landscape any preschooler would love.
Rusty Keeler, an artist and designer from New York state, is heading the project. Lisa Davies runs the Dartmouth Developmental Centre, where the magic will take place. The CBC's Margot Brunelle dropped by to hear about the "before and after" of this playground makeover.
To see some of Rusty's projects that helped create more natural playspaces for children in various parts of the world, click here.

Yes, You Can : No matter how much or how little space you have to garden in, it's never a story of marching from success to success. You might have grown herbs from seed and watched them topple over because of rotted stems. You might have popped out this morning to see how that store-bought delphinium was doing and sworn that you heard the slugs burping from an overnight feast.
Marjorie Willison dropped in with a pep talk to get you through gardening setbacks like that. She's the author of The East Coast Gardener, and answered your questions on flowers, vegetables, shrubs, trees and lawns.


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How Ottawa's MEPs filter requests for information from government politicians or civil servants / Phone-in: Donald Savoie, author of "Power : Where Is It ?" "Where does real power lie in Canada ?"

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

"Can I Get Back To You On That ?" : One of the notions closely related to power is control. And in this uncertain world, people with power have always done what they can to control people and events that might destabilize that power.
But in anything involving as many people as the federal government - from politicians to civil servants and appointees - what's the state of the art in 2010 ?
Mike Blanchfield is one of the Canadian Press reporters who obtained nearly 1000 pages of documents known as Message Event Proposals - or MEPs. They're the template for the Prime Minister's Office to evaluate every request for a comment or interview. The many uses of these filtering devices were covered in a series of articles. To see some examples of MEPs, click here. We spoke with Mr Blanchfield about the effect of MEPs on the line that traditionally separated the public service and political staffers.

Everywhere and Nowhere: As an individual citizen, it's easy to feel you're out out the loop when it comes to major decisions. For instance, nobody in government or the civil service asked you whether it was necessary to spend more than a billion dollars on security for the G8 & G20. Nobody asked whether you'd rather arrange your mortgage or small business loan with someone at a call centre halfway around the world rather than with the manager of your local bank.
But decisions are made, and it's almost impossible to say who exercises power to make them because the process has become very opaque.
Is it a political leader ? A bureaucrat ? The CEO of a multinational ? The semi-mystical global marketplace ?
Donald Savoie has been fascinated by the problem of finding out exactly where decision-making power exists. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Public Administration & Governance at l'Université de Moncton and is the author of several books on the changing patterns of influence that shape our society - most recently, one with a blunt title : "Power : Where Is It ?" Our question : "Where does real power lie in Canada ?"


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Why bodychecking at Peewee level of hockey is bad for your kid's health / Candid look at the uneasy relationship between politics and science / Phone-in: What's a must-see destination or event in the Maritimes this summer ?

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

To Check or Not To Check ? That's been the choice for every minor hockey league in Canada. And they've all made choices over the past decade, as evidence about concussions and serious injuries - especially among players 12-and-under - has mounted.
Now, the Journal of the American Medical Association has published a study comparing hockey players in provinces that made different choices. Researchers followed 2000 peewees : half from Alberta, where checking is permitted, and half from Quebec, where it isn't. The study concludes that in leagues that allowed checking, there's a 3-fold increased risk of all game-related injuries (concussion, severe injury, and severe concussion).

All three Maritime Provinces permit bodychecking at the Peewee level. 
We spoke with Dr Natalie Yanchar , a pediatric general surgeon and Medical Director of the Trauma Program at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax. She is also the Canadian Pediatric Society's recipient of the 2010 Victor Marchessault Advocacy Award, which honours individuals or organizations who have made outstanding contributions. Dr. Natalie Yanchar was recognised for her contributions to injury prevention legislation and guidelines.

Political Tradeoffs and the Health of the Ocean: Whether it's a coastal nation with pristine beaches or a landlocked one that imports all its seafood, you'd like to think that politicians would accept that there's mutual interest in making good decisions about the ocean - decisions based on the best science available.
But Dr Susan Lieberman has seen the way that political trade-offs can trump ocean science - over and over again - with sorry results for the planet.Dr Lieberman is Director of International Policy at the Pew Environment Group, and has led the World Wildlife Fund in policy and advocacy related to several international treaties, including CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.She was in Halifax to deliver the 2010 Elisabeth Mann-Borgese Lecture, entitled "Science Versus Politics : Tales From CITES".

Road Trip ! We live in a glorious part of the world and there's plenty going on in it this summer. From islands like Miscou, Panmure and Tancook, to historic sites and local festivals, the list of things to see and do is a long one. So, if you have a camping trip with the kids in mind, are contemplating a biking holiday with friends, or even a meander down country lanes, this was the phone in for you.
Our guide was Harvey Sawler. He and photographer George Fischer have criss-crossed the region and the result is a book called Unforgettable Atlantic Canada - a province-by-province listing of some the area's greatest tourists hits - and many lesser known gems. We asked what you'd recommend as a must-see place or event in the Maritimes this summer.


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NB's McNulty-O'Dell family channels grief to end drunk driving / What happened when a superior went snooping through an employee's personal email account in a town office / Phone-in: Should your boss have the right to monitor your computer use ?

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Not An Accident : For the McNulty-O'Dell family of New Brunswick, everything changed one autumn afternoon more than three years ago. The car the family was travelling in was hit by a drunk driver, just outside Salisbury. The children survived, with terrible physical and emotional injuries. Their mother and father were killed.
The CBC's Sarah Trainor brought us a remarkable story of love and healing - and a growing family commitment to support the goals of MADD - Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

No Privacy, No Protection : Before today's phone-in on online privacy rights in the workplace, we played an excerpt from last Sunday's Maritime Magazine. The CBC's Shaun Waters explored what happened in one workplace : the town office of Nackawic, New Brunswick, where Leanne Mullin used to be confidential secretary to the Council. The story began when she found out that a supervisor had hacked into her personal Hotmail account and had been reading emails for months.
[To hear the whole programme, click here].
But what happened in the town office of Nackawic raises many questions - most of which remain unresolved. Whose rights prevail when you connect to the online world from your workplace : the employer's or the employee's ? Are some things off limits to supervisors ? Or nothing, when you're online during your hours of work ?
Our guest was David Fraser, a Partner with the legal firm of McInnes Cooper. He provides opinions related to Canadian privacy law for both Canadian and international clients and is the author of the popular Canadian Privacy Law Blog  .
The question : Should your boss have the right to monitor your computer use ?


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Maritime scientist in Gulf of Mexico explains controversial decision to inject dispersant chemicals to break up BP's leaking oil / Phone-in: Mary Anne White & Richard Wassersug on the sense of smell and The Science of Everyday Life

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Disperse - But How Far ? For several weeks, Maritime scientist Dr Kenneth Lee has been helping monitor attempts to contain and clean up oil leaking from BP's well in the Gulf of Mexico. Dr Lee is with the Centre for Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Research at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth, and an expert in chemical oil dispersants. He's been part of the US-led team of scientists monitoring the spill since early May. He explained the rationale behind the controversial use of chemicals to disperse the oil.

The Winner, By A Nose: Oh, sure - you can say you have a scent-free workplace or meeting, but really - do you expect your nose to believe that ? If your neighbour in the next apartment burns the toast or if someone in the elevator is returning from a smoke break outside, your brain gets the message immediately.
But why do we - and so many other organisms - have the sense of smell ? And what about our range of reactions to particular scents - from fear or hunger to lust or nausea ?
Mary Anne White & Richard Wassersug can smell a good topic to kick off their phone-in. Mary Anne is University Research Professor of Chemistry & Physics at Dalhousie University. Richard is Professor of Biology, Anatomy & Neurobiology at Dal, and was in the Melbourne studio of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation today (or, from our time frame, tomorrow). They answered your questions about The Science of Everyday Life.


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Decommissioned sub with bleak future in the Maritimes becomes tourist attraction in Québec / Phone-in: Bonnie Adams of Barley, Malt & Vine on making beer or wine at home

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Up Periscope & Up Paid Admissions: Promoting tourism in the Maritimes - or anywhere else in Canada - is always a challenge. Every region looks for something new and interesting to attract visitors.
Well, how about taking a decommissioned East Coast submarine and turning it into a museum ? That's what happened to HMCS Onondaga. The Oberon-class sub was one of four that floated quietly for years in Halifax Harbour after they were decommissioned.
Now, Onondaga has a new lease on life as a star attraction in Rimouski, Quebec. As the CBC's Susan Woodfine reports, tourists are clamouring to get aboard.
By the way, the three other subs that were decommissioned at the same time - the Olympus, Objibway, and Okanogan - remain afloat on the Dartmouth side of Halifax Harbour in the naval annex dockyard. The Department of National Defence hasn't made any decisions about how to dispose of them, and says they are inspected regularly to ensure they are "safe to float".
So the Onondaga has moved on to become a tourist attraction in Rimouski. But is there a new tourist attraction in your community that the rest of the region should hear about & visit ? Or perhaps something that isn't even promoted as a tourist attraction but which would interest visitors if only they knew about it ? Call our answering machine at 1-800-565-5463.
By the way, next Wednesday, we'll be joined by Harvey Sawler, author of "Unforgettable Atlantic Canada : 100 Must-See Destinations & Events" (complete with photos by George Fischer). We'll want to hear which destinations & events are a must for anyone on the move this summer

DIY Bevvies: Whether you enjoy a crisp white summer wine or a cool beer on the deck with your burger, the taste is especially memorable if you've made the beverage yourself. Bonnie Adams of Barley, Malt and Vine in Saint John answered questions about home brewing and winemaking.


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Safer shelter for survivors of Haitian earthquake / Why Maritime entrepreneurs are stockpiling used flourescent lights / Phone-in: Cleo Paskal : What's the most effective thing world leaders should do about environmental change ?

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Disaster and Design: The last time we spoke with Neil Bauman, he was about to fly to Haiti. He's an architect and shelter co-ordinator with the Red Cross, based in Saint John. He was leaving to assist in the relief effort, following the earthquake that killed thousands and left many more homeless. Mr Bauman has helped design shelters for people in some of the most traumatized places on earth, and this week, he was in Halifax for the Annual Red Cross Disaster Conference where he showed a prototype of the structure to be used in Haiti.

Toxic Problem or Business Opportunity ? It's just a drop, but it adds up. A single energy-efficient twirly flourescent bulb now common in many workplaces and homes contains an insignificant amount of mercury - one hundred times less than what's in a dental filling. But hundreds of thousands of those twirlys are ending up in landfills. And unless they're disposed of properly, that mercury will pose a risk to the environment. No regulations exist in Nova Scotia to cover their disposal - and a couple of entrepreneurs in Dartmouth see that as a business opportunity.
CBC reporter Jennifer Henderson dropped in to meet with Dave Hall and Dana Emmerson of Dan-X Recycling , and asked about their business plan to divert mercury waste.

Missing the Big Picture ? It's not unusual for people to be mystified by the highly-policed meetings of G8 and G20 leaders. But here's the skinny on the two upcoming gatherings in Canada : the G20 in Toronto will focus on economics - managing the transition from stimulus spending to cutting the deficit created by stimulus spending, global trade issues and banking regulations. The G8 in Muskoka will reportedly lead to pledges of aid for maternal & child health in developing countries and include sessions on the umbrella topic of "security issues".
What might surprise the leaders is that a Nanos poll released this week shows that Canadians think global warming trumps all the items on the G8 and G20 agendas.
But we might not be dealing with Two Solitudes here. Changes in the environment - which affect millions, if not billions of people - have a great deal to do with security, trade, the economy and the future of countries rich and poor. What's not clear is whether world leaders are making those connections.
Cleo Paskal does. She's the author of "Global Warring : How Environmental, Economic & Political Crises Will Redraw The World Map". Ms Pascal is with the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London and has given briefings on environmental change and security issues to CSIS, the British Ministry of Defence and CEOs of global corporations. She was in our CBC London studio as we asked : What's the most effective thing world leaders could do about environmental change ?


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Tattoo artist thinks Maritime governments should outline and colour in her industry with health regulations / Remembering Doug Harkness / Phone-in : installing and maintaining septic systems

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Missing the Point ? More and more Maritimers are dropping their pants, exposing their bellies and rolling up their sleeves - for tattoos and piercings. The demand for all that ink and metal has created a boom for entrepreneurs who provide those services. Some have opened home businesses where people can have their bodies decorated and accessorised.
But Darren Fisher, a councillor with the Halifax Regional Municipality, thinks tattoo shops should be banned from residential areas and limited to commercial zones.There's going to be a public hearing on Mr Fisher's suggestion next week.
But someone who works in the tattoo industry feels there's a much more important issue than zoning which elected officials are ignoring : the health of Maritimers getting tattooed and pierced.
Amber Thorpe has worked in studios in Ontario and Alberta, and now runs Adept Tattoos in Halifax.

One Flush and It's Gone...Somewhere : If you live in one of the many Maritime homes or cottages not hooked up to municpal sewer pipes you are always keenly interested in what goes down the drain and into your septic system. Those systems require careful maintenance. When they're running smoothly, you barely notice them. But when they act up, the results can be very unpleasant, from soggy lawns to tainted wells.
We re-assembled our panel of experts to take your questions about keeping your septic system in good shape. Gilles Gallant is the owner of Gallant Septic Services in Grande-Digue, New Brunswick. Morley Foy is an engineer with the Water Management Division at PEI's Department of Environment, Energy and Forestry. Phil Cameron is a septic system consultant based in Truro, and the former Chair of Wastewater Nova Scotia.


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Remembering Doug Harkness, dean of harness racing writers in the Maritimes / Sir John Houghton on exploiting oil in high risk areas / Phone-in: Home energy consultant Art Irwin on air conditioners

Posted by Costas HALAVREZOS

Life In The Fast Lane: He was witty and provocative and irreverent and no one knew more about harness racing in the Maritimes. For almost 40 years, Doug Harkness was the sport's greatest chronicler and promoter in this part of the world. He died last Friday after a lengthy illness.
Ross Galbraith knew Doug Harkness well. Mr. Galbraith is a director of StandardBred Canada, the body that regulates harness racing in this county, and a board member of Horse Racing New Brunswick. Bill Semple is a former Sports editor of the Journal Pioneer in Summerside and a life long friend of Doug Harkness. They reminisced about the remarkable journalist.


A Teachable Moment in the Gulf ? In any discussion of Climate Change, Sir John Houghton is a central figure. He was co-chair of the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's scientific assessment working group. He was a professor in atmospheric physics at the University of Oxford, and founder of the Hadley Centre, the UK's foremost climate change research facility.
Sir John once wrote that "The only way humans will act is if there's been an accident".
Well, we're seeing a terrible accident unfold in the Gulf of Mexico in the pursuit of a carbon-based fuel. But in Canada, we're also seeing BP & other companies keenly interested in drilling for oil in the Arctic, and a government that's keen on royalties.
In Part 2 of our conversation (to hear Part 1, click here), I asked Sir John if he sees an accident like that in the Gulf having any effect on questions about whether we should be exploiting these fuels in high-risk environments.

Sir John is also chairman of the John Ray Initiative, an organisation dedicated to "connecting Environment, Science and Christianity". On Monday, he told us how his scientific research and religious beliefs reinforce one another, since they both suggest being good stewards of the earth and alleviating human suffering. We received some emails on this, producer Deborah Woolway read them.

It's Not the Heat, It's the Humidity : You know the circle of life in the average Maritime dwelling : dry air in the winter, humid air in the summer. Now that the furnaces have gone silent, the question remains : how do you deal with the heat & humidity when they strike ? Art Irwin operates Irwin Energy Consulting Services in Halifax, and he returned with advice on heating and ventilation.


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