Adverse effects of artificial flooding

Monday, April 29

(Submitted by Cheryl Kennedy Courcelles)

Cheryl Kennedy Courcelles

Cheryl lives just outside St Adolphe.

Here we go again, the province has sent out their email, Facebook, Twitter and media announcements that they shall be operating the floodway gates, in accordance to the operations of the floodway. What is the ripple effect of these operations?

Well, those flood waters now hit the gate and come backwards into the R.M. of Ritchot until it reaches an artificial level of forced flooding into the floodway channel.

What does that mean for us? It means that we have to deal with the 6.6-foot rise that is coming upstream from the south, as well, we will then be hit with about another four feet of water or so coming backwards at us from the operations.

This forces the Red River to leave her banks and start artificially flooding us through the fields, ditches, and low-lying areas.

What saddens us, and it is extremely painful to watch and listen to, is what happens to the wildlife when these silent, dirty, wood-loaded and ice-cold flood waters start covering up their nests and dens and taking over their homes and wild lands.

Read More »

We are high and dry!

Monday, April 29

Roxane Lucrece Anderson

Roxame lives in Breezy Point where she is President of the Flood Prone Ratepayers Group of St. Andrews.

What a relief. All roads stayed open this weekend.

The river ice left on Saturday while I was away at my niece's 18th birthday party. So I did get to leave after all. The waiting for the flood is over.
 
The water inside the ring dike is almost gone. We were able to remove a frozen drain cap. I am so glad floodwaters never reached our newly-constructed dike as the top soil would have washed away.

More good news: Flood Prone Ratepayers of St. Andrew's member, Albert Makara, sent us this photo of the end of Main, where Netley Creek meets the Red River.

The river ice is well on the way to the marsh.

Everything's normal. Like old times.

The river never swamped the first bank. We didn't see any uprooted trees floating downriver as in high water years. The 2,000 tree saplings I planted along our riverbank last spring will have a chance to grow --- replacement soldiers for the ones lost in 2009.

Read More »

In flood times

Monday, April 29

Cheryl Kennedy Courcelles

Cheryl lives just outside St Adolphe.

In flood times, one tends to do a lot of praying that Mother Nature and our modern day drainage movement of water will be kind to us and our animals, to our communities, our homes, businesses, infrastructure and ecosystems.

It appears that our prayers have been answered this weekend with the flood levels being lowered twice by a couple of feet, merci beaucoup!

Yippee yahoo, with the slower spring melt, evaporation, the work of the Amphibex cutting up the ice downstream, the ice breaking up into smaller pieces and not jamming up on our bridges in the Red River and causing fast local flooding. The river so far is staying mainly within her banks, minus the low lying areas brings such a relief. It feels like about 10,000 pounds have been lifted off our shoulders and perhaps we can get some sleep again and life can get back to normal.

It is not to say we do not stay major flood alert ready, we always do, but it sure takes some of the pressure and stress off of us.

Read More »

St-Lazare

Monday, April 29

Cheri Chartier

Cheri is a teacher in St. Lazare.

I live in the tiny community of St-Lazare, located where Assinibione and Qu'Appelle rivers meet, so flooding is a concern from two directions.

Right now, people seem to be more concerned about whether winter is ever going to end. We just want spring to get here even if it means a potential flood.

The weather is still cool but somehow the sun seems to be melting the snow slowly. We live in a valley and the hills are dry and some of the ditches are even dry, which is a really good sign in an area prone to flooding.

We've all been watching the melt, complaining when we hear about the snow in the forecast again, and again. And we woke up to snow again on Wednesday morning. I think it goes without saying that at the end of April, we are sick and tired of snow.

Read More »

St. Clements

Friday, April 26

Selkirk bridge

Heather Stanik

A lifetime resident and current employee of the Rural Municipality of St. Clements

As a lifelong resident of the Rural Municipality of St. Clements, I am all too familiar with our annual spring flooding.

Although as a child, I don't recall the spring flooding to be such a major event [but] I do know in the past few years it is an event that our community prepares to look forward to.

Personally, my interest of watching each year's flood unfold began in 1996 or 1997. I believe it was in 1996 that we experienced major flooding in our south end of the province, and it was 1997 that St. Clements was hit hard.

Not only am I a resident of St. Clements, living on a street that runs along the Red River, with my property also having frontage on Cook's Creek, I am also an employee of the RM. The flood of '97 is what really impacted me to become an avid watcher of the annual flooding.

It was then that I realized just how powerful events can effect a community.

Read More »

It could get interesting

Friday, April 26

Our house surround by a massive dike which encircles our ¾ acre yard.

Roxane Lucrece Anderson

Roxame lives in Breezy Point where she is President of the Flood Prone Ratepayers Group of St. Andrews.

That's all I can say when asked if I'm worried about this flood season.  Living north of the floodway outlet in Lockport, and 18 miles south where the Red River meets Lake Winnipeg, we worry now. Yet this morning, the river ice is still at a comfortable level. I had to wade through icy cold spring runoff that has gathered in the low spot in our pasture to reach the upper river bank. This time yesterday morning, I was still able to get to ice level but now there is water in the lower bank, and I don't own hip waders. What a difference the above zero temperature did during the night. Yet one would think that our house, situated on a ridge, located 215 metres west of the river, would be far enough away from any flood threat. But that wasn't the case in April 2009.

"You won't have any worries now!" Visitors say this when they see the massive ring dike, completed in November 2012 that encases our home and garage. We feel good about it too. Yet once the dike was built, we couldn't celebrate it, while many home owners remained not flood protected, and a dike party would seem like bragging.

I can't remember a colder April. With warming temperatures, the heavy snow melt on the dike and in the yard site is melting now. We have been pumping water out over the dike all week. That is a new task for us. At least this season, I did not have to pack up the house and move everything out like we did in 2011. Still, waiting for spring break up is the hardest part. We have nightmares still.

Read More »

Souris Manitoba

Friday, April 26

In 2011, the little iron bridge in the background was totally submerged in water for much of the summer

Darci Semeschuk

Darci works for the Plaindealer newspaper and lives between Brandon and Souris.

April 26, 2013 looks a lot different in Souris, Manitoba, than it did in 2011 or even 2012.

This is the first day the thermometer is predicted to hit double digits and Souris, like the rest of Manitoba, is thrilled to see the warmth. If there are any concerns that a fast melt on the still-frozen Souris River will bring rushing flood waters to this community, residents are doing a good job of keeping that fear under wraps.

Taking a walk around town you would never believe that the province issued a moderate to major flood outlook in their April 10 flood forecast for the Souris and its tributaries.

Nowhere is there the mad rush, the panic to fill sandbags or build dikes like there was in 2011. In fact you would be hard pressed to find any sign of flood preparation in the entire community. Maybe they are too preoccupied fretting about the 1% PST increase.

Emergency Measures Coordinator Sven Kreusch, who underwent a baptism by fire when he was appointed to that position in 2011, just in time to deal with the "once-in-300-year flood," feels Souris is well prepared to deal with whatever Mother Nature sends our way this spring.

Read More »

Untitled Document