CCMAs Calgary Stampede Canada Day Canadian Screen Awards Giller Prize Hockey Night Olympics Season Launch TIFF

CBC Congratulates Nobel Laureate Alice Munro

101013_alice-munro.jpg
Alice Munro, winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature and "master of the contemporary story." -- Getty Images

She's the first Canadian woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, and the first Canadian-based author, period, to receive the honour. Alice Munro is the 110th Nobel laureate in literature, The Swedish Academy announced Thursday morning. 

The 82-year-old writer, dubbed the "master of the contemporary story" by the awards committee, was asleep at home in Victoria when the news was made. (And according to the Nobel Prize's Twitter, she let their congratulatory phone call go to voice mail when they tried reaching her -- in the middle of the night, B.C. time.) 

But Munro, who's twice won the Giller and claimed the Man International Booker Prize in 2009, took CBC's call. 

World Report's David Common reached Munro for her thoughts on the Nobel -- and she expressed her shock at being only the 13th woman to win:



Later this morning, Heather Hiscox spoke with Munro by phone:



And though Munro has frequently been considered for the Nobel -- Ladbrokes had her positioned as one of this year's top contenders for the honour, second only to Haruki Murakami -- she told Hiscox how she'd "forgotten all about [being in the running]" because "it seemed like one of those pipe dreams -- it might happen, but it probably wouldn't." 

"I can't describe it," she said of the honour. "It's more than I can say."

But in a statement, shared on CBC's Metro Morning, Munro expressed her thoughts on the event. "I'm particularly glad that winning this award will please so many Canadians. I'm happy too that this will bring more attention to Canadian writing."

Among those happy and pleased Canadians are a bunch of CBC stars, who shared their congratulations on Twitter.

First, here's how the Nobel Prize committee shared the news online:





Which would account for Peter Mansbridge's reaction:



A variety of CBC personalities followed his lead:

George Stroumboulopoulos



Jian Ghomeshi





Eleanor Wachtel



Metro Morning





David Common



Dwight Drummond



Steve Patterson



Shelagh Rogers



Deana Sumanac



Tom Power



Ian Hanomansing



Mark Critch was cheering for another author, however:



But the Prime Minister seemed to take the news in stride:



All these congratulations, and many more, however, might not be read by Munro herself, since she doesn't bother with the social media. Not yet, anyway.



As a Nobel Prize winner for literature, Munro joins the company of Toni Morrison, Ernest Hemingway and George Bernard Shaw. It's unclear what she'll do with her award money. According to CBC News, the 2012 purse was worth approximately $1.3 million. 

Her 2012 short-story collection Dear Life, is said to be her last published work. Munro told the National Post this June that she was "probably not going to write any more," a pledge she maintained while speaking with Hiscox Thursday morning on CBC News Network.  

Munro won the 1968 Governor General's Award for Fiction with her first published book of short stories, Dance of the Happy Shades, and has been a celebrated author ever since, also acclaimed for further collections including Lives of Girls and Women, The Progress of Love and The Love of a Good Woman.

The last Canadian to win the Nobel Prize for Literature was Saul Bellow in 1976, though the Quebec-born author was more widely regarded as an American author. He moved to the States as a kid.

For more on Alice Munro, CBC Books has a collection of her career highlights, including interviews and a suggested reading list of her best work. They also have a fact sheet on the Nobel Prize for Literature. You can also check out Munro's extensive history of CBC interviews in the digital archives.

Related:
2013 Giller Prize Shortlist Revealed; CBC Books Has Cover-to-Cover Coverage
Standout Canadian Book-to-Film Adaptations
You've Got the Power! Tell Canada Reads Which Novel Could Change Our Country