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Little Mosque in the news

The Metro Times Detroit invited a "diverse" group of Arab-Americans to discuss Little Mosque and the new U.S. show Arabs in America:

"The one criticism I have, and it's a mild one, is that on both shows, all of the (Muslim) characters are Indo-Pakistanis," panelist Ron Amen noted. "I think if they really wanted to take a bold step forward, they would introduce an Arab, possibly even an Arab Shiite. Then they would really be trendsetters."

Another panelist, Warren David recalled:

"The last time I was invited to a screening was the late '80s, and it was [the NBC terrorist TV-movie] Under Siege. I remember coming out and a reporter asked me what I thought of it. I said, 'I feel like I've been raped.' And they carried that comment like it was news. We've really come a long way when you can see programs like these that really humanize a culture, a society. I think it's the greatest thing. I hope there are more programs like them." Link

The Toronto Star reviews Little Mosque Season One on DVD:

"Behind the Mosque" is 13 minutes of the actors and producers talking about the joy of working on the show. Colin Brunton notes that "This is true of every Canadian producer: it's so gratifying to work on something that people are actually watching." Link

By contrast “Little Mosque,” which is returning for a second season this month and can be seen on YouTube, takes a brassier approach to its subject, the multiethnic congregation of a rural mosque. The members are just trying live in harmony with skeptical residents in the fictional town of Mercy, in Saskatchewan, while dealing with their own religious quandaries. Is a “burkini” the solution at a women-only swimming class with a gay male instructor? Can there be a Halal-o-ween?

The New York Times contrasts Little Mosque with shows like 24:

"Little Mosque,” which is returning for a second season this month and can be seen on YouTube, takes a brassier approach to its subject, the multiethnic congregation of a rural mosque. The members are just trying live in harmony with skeptical residents in the fictional town of Mercy, in Saskatchewan, while dealing with their own religious quandaries. Is a “burkini” the solution at a women-only swimming class with a gay male instructor? Can there be a Halal-o-ween?

“It’s not making fun, but using humor to talk about some of the things that are important,” said Amir Hussain, a professor of theological studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. Link