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7 Amazing Canadian Paralympians you should know

 

Greg Westlake (R) of Canada and Audun Bakke of Norway compete for the puck during Ice Sledge Hockey in Sochi, Russia. (Photo by Justin Setterfield/Getty Images)

Becoming a Paralympic athlete takes so much talent, hard work and dedication. These Canadian Paralympians are a just a few of the many impressive athletes to watch at the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Paralympics:

Brian McKeever — Cross-country skiing

Brian McKeever skis with his guide

Brian McKeever of Canada competes with his guide at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Paralympics in Whistler, Canada. (Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images)

Brian is the top visually impaired skier in the world and he's Canada’s most successful winter Paralympian — he's won 13 medals (10 gold, two silver, one bronze), not to mention all of his many World Championship wins. He was already an accomplished skier when he started to lose his eyesight at age 18. He began the Canadian Paralympic program at the time and the rest is history! He is Canada's flag bearer for this year's games.

Erin Latimer — Para alpine skiing

Erin Latimer skiing

Erin Latimer competes in the Women's Slalom at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

Erin was born without part of her right arm, but that didn’t stop her from taking up skiing at only two years old! Erin won six medals in the 2016 – 2017 World Cup circuit and also competed in the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics where she made it into the top 10 three times.

Mac Marcoux — Para alpine skiing

Mac Marcoux skis with his guide

Mac Marcoux (L) and his guide Robin Femy compete during the Men's Downhill Visually Impraired at the XI Paralympic Olympic games near Sochi. (KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)

Mac is a five-time world champion and he won gold and two bronze at the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics. Mac is the international favourite at PyeongChang in all of the Para alpine skiing events for men with visual impairments. His first guide was his brother Billy Joe Marcoux — the two used to race go-carts competitively until Mac started to lose his eyesight at age 9.

Michelle Salt — Para snowboarding

Michelle Salt snowboarding

Michelle Salt competes during the Women's Para Snowboard Cross Standing at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. (Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)

Michelle was the first female athlete on the first ever Canadian Para-snowboard team at the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics! Michelle lost her leg in a motorcycle accident in 2011, but decided the day that she found out her leg had been amputated to become a Paralympian.

Greg Westlake — Para ice hockey

Greg Westlake in his sledge ice hockey getup in the hockey rink

Greg Westlake looks on during the match between Canada and Sweden in Sochi, Russia. (Photo by Dennis Grombkowski/Getty Images)

Greg has been the Canadian Para ice hockey team captain since 2011. He and his team won gold at the 2006 Torino Winter Paralympic Games and has led his team to bronze at the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympic Games. Greg had both of his legs amputated when he was 18 months old — he started playing Para ice hockey when he was 15 years old, and joined Team Canada at age 17.

Mark Arendz — Biathlon

Mark Arendz skiing

Mark Arendz competes in the Men's 12.5km Standing Biathlon in Vancouver, Canada. (Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images)

Mark has won both silver and bronze in the biathlon at the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics as well as many other World Championships. Mark started skiing at age five. He lost his arm in a farming accident when he was 7 years old but continued to ski, even competing in able-bodied competitions. He became particularly interested in biathlon after watching the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

Ina Forrest — Wheelchair curling

Ina Forrest throws a rock from her wheelchair

Ina Forrest delivers a stone during the World Wheelchair Curling Championship 2017 in Gangneung, South Korea, as her teammate steadies her chair. (Photo by Han Myung-Gu/Getty Images)

Ina was named Top Female Athlete by the Canadian Paralympic Committee in 2014 and has been inducted into the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame. She won gold at both 2010 and 2014 Winter Paralympics as well as many other World Championships. She was 21 when she was in a car accident and lost the use of her legs — she started curling at age 42 while her kids were in school.