Schedule

 July 2014  August 2014 September 2014


July


Tuesday, July 1
AFTER ATHEISM: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON GOD AND RELIGION, Part 2 - John Caputo
Public discussion of religion tends to polarize between two extremes: religious fundamentalism, and the aggressive atheism of such writers as Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens. But much of what people actually believe falls somewhere in between. It is subtler and more tentative. David Cayley explores the work of five thinkers whose recent books have charted new paths for religion:. Part 2: John Caputo, author of The Weakness of God.

Wednesday, July 2
PLAYING MOZART WITH PINCHAS ZUKERMAN
The illustrious conductor of Canada's National Arts Centre Orchestra joins IDEAS host Paul Kennedy to celebrate the musical genius of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Pinchas Zukerman dissects the Violin Concerto No. 3 from the perspective of both the maestro waving the baton, and the soloist playing the fiddle.


Thursday, July 3
AGING BY THE BOOK
Baby boomers are identified with youth culture. So who do they think they are when they get old? The answer may be in their stories, the ones they tell and the ones they share. Ottawa librarian Wendy Robbins looks at the growing popularity of a narrative approach to aging, even for individuals with dementia.


Friday, July 4
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - A.C. Grayling
British philosopher A.C. Grayling surveys the origins of the ideas of individual liberties and rights that formed the modern West. Produced in collaboration with the University of Manitoba's Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics, Professor Grayling speaks before an audience at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg. This lecture is the first in a series of upcoming talks called Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights.

 




Monday, July 7
AFTER ATHEISM: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON GOD AND RELIGION, Part 3 - William Cavanagh
Public discussion of religion tends to polarize between two extremes: religious fundamentalism, and the aggressive atheism of such writers as Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens. But much of what people actually believe falls somewhere in between. It is subtler and more tentative. David Cayley explores the work of five thinkers whose recent books have charted new paths for religion. Part 3: William Cavanagh, author of of Migrations of the Holy: God, State and the Political Meaning of the Church.


Tuesday, July 8
AFTER ATHEISM: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON GOD AND RELIGION, Part 4 - James Carse
Public discussion of religion tends to polarize between two extremes: religious fundamentalism, and the aggressive atheism of such writers as Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens. But much of what people actually believe falls somewhere in between. It is subtler and more tentative. David Cayley explores the work of five thinkers whose recent books have charted new paths for religion. Part 4: James Carse author of The Religious Case Against Belief.


Wednesday, July 9
THE GREAT BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE, Part 1
We used to need libraries to make the sum of human knowledge available to all. Today we have Wikipedia, where the sum of human knowledge can be shaped by all of us. But can we trust it? Philip Coulter suggests that the collective mind is perhaps the best mind we have. Part 2 airs on Wednesday, July 16.


Thursday, July 10
THE CHOSEN, Part 1
It is an idea that is ancient, and yet time has not dulled its vitality. It is an idea that echoes throughout history, and has inspired both genocide - and selfless service to others. It is alive today in the rhetoric of American politicians trumpeting their country's "special role in the world."  But it is also alive in the lives of ordinary people who devote their time helping the marginalized and forgotten.  It is the biblical idea of chosenness. In this two-part series IDEAS producer Frank Faulk examines this biblical concept's centrality to Western thought and culture, through the lens of religion, politics, and psychology.  Part 2 airs Thursday, July 17.


Friday, July 11
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - MARTHA NUSSBAUM
American scholar Martha Nussbaum explores how human rights might be best approached on the basis of capabilities. Produced in collaboration with the University of Manitoba's Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics, Professor Nussbaum speaks before an audience at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg. This lecture is part of series of talks called Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights.  Martha Nussbaum's lecture is called The Capabilities Approach to Human Rights.





Monday, July 14
AFTER ATHEISM: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON GOD AND RELIGION, Part 5 - Roger Lundin
Public discussion of religion tends to polarize between two extremes: religious fundamentalism, and the aggressive atheism of such writers as Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens. But much of what people actually believe falls somewhere in between. It is subtler and more tentative. David Cayley explores the work of five thinkers whose recent books have charted new paths for religion. Part 5: Roger Lundin, author of Believing Again: Doubt and Faith in a Secular Age.


Tuesday, July 15
HUMAN RIGHTS AND TODAY'S ABORIGINAL CHILDREN AND YOUTH
Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond is British Columbia's Representative for Children and Youth. She believes the welfare of aboriginal children is a human rights issue. In the 2013 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture, Turpel-Lafond makes the case there's been little progress on the human rights of First Nation's children in today's Canada. The 2013 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture is presented in collaboration with The Laurier Institution, UBC Continuing Studies, and CBC Radio One's IDEAS.


Wednesday, July 16
THE GREAT BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE, Part 2
We used to need libraries to make the sum of human knowledge available to all. Today we have Wikipedia, where the sum of human knowledge can be shaped by all of us. But can we trust it? Philip Coulter suggests that the collective mind is perhaps the best mind we have.


Thursday, July 17
THE CHOSEN, Part 2
It is an idea that is ancient, and yet time has not dulled its vitality. It is an idea that echoes throughout history, and has inspired both genocide - and selfless service to others. It is alive today in the rhetoric of American politicians trumpeting their country's "special role in the world." But it is also alive in the lives of ordinary people who devote their time helping the marginalized and forgotten.  It is the biblical idea of chosenness. IDEAS producer Frank Faulk examines this biblical concept's centrality to Western thought and culture, through the lens of religion, politics, and psychology.


Friday, July 18
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - Kwame Anthony Appiah
Kwame Anthony Appiah is a Ghanaian-born philosopher and cultural theorist. In this episode of IDEAS, he ponders the inseparable links between culture, identity, and human rights. From the lecture series Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg.





Monday, July 21
CATCHING THE GAME
Why do so many of us devote so much time to watching sports? And why do so many others  seem immune? Paul Kennedy settles into his seat to watch for an answer.


Tuesday, July 22
TOP DOG: THE SCIENCE OF WINNING AND LOSING

What makes a champion? Why do some wilt in high-pressure competition, while others rise to the occasion? Drawing on science, psychology, sports and economics, authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman explore the anatomy of building champions. We also feature stories from freestyle wrestling champion Ohenewa Akuffo, Muay Thai world champion Clifton Brown and budding figure-skater Annie DeCoteau-Vogelsang.


Wednesday, July 23
ALONE INSIDE
When the concept of solitary confinement was first implemented in the early 19th century, the idea was not to punish the prisoner, but to give him space to reflect and reform. Two centuries later, despite the growing use of segregation in Canada and the United States, the practice continues to produce very different results. Prisoners who have lived through solitary confinement say the experience is torturous. Freelance journalist Brett Story explores the roots of this practice in North America, and the profound and often devastating impact it has on people who are severed from social contact.


Thursday, July 24
ONCE UPON A PLANET
Science fiction writers have been dreaming up planets - and aliens - for years. But recently, astronomers have discovered hundreds of planets far beyond our solar system. Is there life on those planets, too? In fact and in fiction, Stephen Humphrey explores our need to know that we're not alone in the cosmos.


Friday, July 25
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - John Borrows
John Borrows is an Anishinabe scholar and expert in Indigenous law. He presents a lecture on the connections between First Nations and human rights. It's from a series called Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle Human Rights taking place at the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights, in Winnipeg.




Monday, July 28 - Friday, August 1
BLOOD: THE STUFF OF LIFE - THE 2013 CBC MASSEY LECTURES BY LAWRENCE HILL
Blood runs red through all of us and carries the same life-giving energy to every human being. We've learned a lot about the science of blood, but it is as complex and mysterious as ever. Culturally, blood has a mystique all its own, and what it stands for- tribe, family, race, gender - has divided us since the beginning of time. Blood pulses through our religions, through literature and the visual arts, and every time it pools or spills, we learn a little more about what brings human beings together and what divides us. Author Lawrence Hill takes us on a fascinating journey through the story of blood. 




August


Monday, August 4
DESIRE DENIED
A new kind of human rights struggle is now being waged - by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people all over the developing world. They're fighting gay-free zones in Ukraine, life in prison for homosexuals in Uganda, and "curative rape" for lesbians in South Africa. IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores how they're creating a new era of rainbow geopolitics.


Tuesday, August 5
HOW WE KILL IN WAR
With every evolution in military technology comes a shift in military tactics. And each shift in tactics pushes our understanding of what is permissible and what is ethical behaviour in war. The American military's use of drones brings with it uncomfortable moral questions. Journalist Naheed Mustafa visits Pakistan and explores the dilemmas posed by drone warfare.


Wednesday, August 6
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
"God is dead. And we have killed him." These notorious words were written by the 19th century German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche. Through his brilliant and explosive writings, he became known as a severe critic of religion and conventional morality. Nietzsche's work is full of pointed aphorisms and dramatic fables and have been eagerly read by generations of students. His philosophy and social criticism still resonate in the 21st century.


Thursday, August 7
END OF THE DIAL
Newspapers, publishing and the recording industry may all be in deep trouble from online media. But pronouncements about the death of radio are premature. Contributor Garth Mullins believes we're witnessing the dawning of a radio renaissance.


Friday, August 8
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - Helena Kennedy
British scholar and broadcaster Baroness Helena Kennedy explores new human rights challenges emerging in the 21st century. It's part of the special lecture series Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights taking place at the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, and organized by the University of Manitoba's Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics.

 




Monday, August 11
THE CROOKED PATH: THE ART OF JEFF WALL, Part 1
Jeff Wall's striking large-scale, photographic artworks exude complex, dramatic power. Often presented as transparencies in light-boxes, his works are owned by most significant art institutions and collectors. Vancouver-based Wall has been instrumental in moving the photographic image to a central place in contemporary art practice. His contributions have secured him a place in art history. In The Crooked Path, curator Ann Pollock explores with Wall his remarkable career trajectory. Part 2 airs on Monday, August 18.


Tuesday, August 12
WALKING MATTERS, Part 1
Ever since our ancestors rose to their feet, our species has been defined by walking upright. But the act involves our minds as well as our bodies. We interpret the act of walking, and give it our stamp - from ramblers to Rousseau, from models and tramps to Buddhist monks. In this two-part series, Marilyn Powell explores the world of walking and what it means to us. Part 2 airs on Tuesday, August 19.


Wednesday, August 13
IDEAS FROM THE TRENCHES - THE LIVING DEAD
There are about 50,000 PhD candidates in Canada. Most of them toil away for years in relative obscurity. This is the debut of an occasional series which tries to turn their research into an hour of radio. In this inaugural episode called Ideas from the Trenches - The Living Dead, producers Tom Howell and Nicola Luksic follow the work of PhD student Myriam Nafte, who studies the circulation and use of human remains in Western society. And they find unexpected connections between the living and the dead.


Thursday, August 14
THE SCIENCE OF SHAKESPEARE
William Shakespeare was born 450 years ago this month, into a period when new ideas about the human body, the earth and the universe were threatening the old medieval worldview. Journalist and author Dan Falk examines the science of the Bard of Avon.


Friday, August 15
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - VANDANA SHIVA
Physicist Vandana Shiva has become one of the world's leading environmental thinkers. In a lecture presented at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, she explores how "earth rights" are human rights. From the lecture series Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights.




Monday, August 18
THE CROOKED PATH: THE ART OF JEFF WALL, Part 2
Jeff Wall's
striking large-scale, photographic artworks exude complex, dramatic power. Often presented as transparencies in light-boxes, his works are owned by most significant art institutions and collectors. Vancouver-based Wall has been instrumental in moving the photographic image to a central place in contemporary art practice. His contributions have secured him a place in art history. In The Crooked Path, curator Ann Pollock explores with Wall his remarkable career trajectory.


Tuesday, August 19
WALKING MATTERS, Part 1
Ever since our ancestors rose to their feet, our species has been defined by walking upright. But the act involves our minds as well as our bodies. We interpret the act of walking, and give it our stamp - from ramblers to Rousseau, from models and tramps to Buddhist monks. In this two-part series, Marilyn Powell explores the world of walking and what it means to u


Wednesday, August 20
IDEAS FROM THE TRENCHES - THE EDUCATION GAP
There are about 50,000 PhD candidates in Canada, toiling away for years in relative obscurity. This is the second of an occasional series which attempts to turn their research into an hour of radio. In this episode, producers Tom Howell and Nicola Luksic follow the work of PhD student Kimberley Tavares. Initially driven to understand why a disproportionate number of black male youth disengage from the school system, she turns to the experiences of black women teachers and the lessons they hold for improving educational outcomes for all marginalized youth.


Thursday, August 21
THE INTERMITTENTLY TRUE ADVENTURES OF MOISHE "TWO-GUN" COHEN
Artful dodger. Edmonton real estate tycoon. Chinese revolutionary. Edmonton writer Paula Simons unravels the unlikely tale of a not-so-nice Jewish boy who went from East End London pickpocket to Prairie con-man to Sun Yat-Sen's gun-running general.


Friday, August 22
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - STEVEN PINKER
Steven Pinker is a global thought leader on the subject of the human mind, human nature, and human violence. He recently presented this talk: A History of Violence and Humanity, at the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg. It's part of the Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights lecture series.




Monday, August 25
CONFLICTED CITIES
It used to be that countries waged war against each other on a battlefield. But now cities are the new conflict zone. From London to Madrid, Baghdad to Nairobi, and Beirut to Mogadishu, civilians on their way to work or just having lunch are caught in the cross-fire. And it's not just terrorism threatening daily life in the city. Climate change, drug cartels and political revolutions all feed a ballooning security industry that promises us safety. IDEAS Contributor Hassan Ghedi Santur explores what happens when our neighbourhoods become high value targets.


Tuesday, August 26 - Wednesday, August 27
CURIOUSER AND CURIOUSER, Part 1 & 2
The Alice books were published almost 150 years ago and are now classics, loved by millions around the world. But mystery still shrouds their author, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, aka Lewis Carroll. Speculation still swirls around his relationship with the real Alice, his child muse, Alice Liddell. Cindy Bisaillon takes us into Charles Dodgson's life and the upside-down world he created, riddled with the anxieties of the Victorian age: advancing technology, the speeding up of time, the survival of the fittest, and the loss of old values.


Thursday, August 28
ESCAPING THE HOLOCAUST
Millions of Jews died in the Holocaust, but very few from Denmark. Why? Historian and journalist Bo Lidegaard investigates how Danish people - and certain Nazis - helped Denmark's Jews flee to safety.


Friday, August 29
FRAGILE FREEDOMS - GERMAINE GREER
Germaine Greer is perhaps the most provocative feminist thinker in the world. In the final lecture from the series,  Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights, Germaine Greer explores women and human rights.



September


Monday, September 1
LABOUR DAY LEVEE
At the beginning of a brand new broadcasting season -- which also happens to be IDEAS' 50th anniversary! -- host Paul Kennedy convenes a now almost-traditional Labour Day Levee, with producers and freelancers who are preparing shows for the next few weeks and months.


Tuesday, September 2
HOW TO DO ORDINARY THINGS, Part 1
"Love doesn't mean doing extraordinary or heroic things. It means knowing how to do ordinary things with tenderness." In 1964, Jean Vanier bought a little house in northern France and invited two mentally disabled men to come and live with him. It was a radical approach to thinking about people on the fringe of society -- to live with them, and most importantly, learn from them, to look for their gifts. On the 50th anniversary of L'Arche, the now-international organization Jean Vanier started, a celebration of a Canadian humanitarian and visionary. Part 2 airs Tuesday, September 9.


Wednesday, September 3
A JUST LIFE
McGill University law professor Roderick A. Macdonald influenced generations of legal minds. His work paved the way for the legalization of same-sex marriage, and led to Canada's apology to residential school survivors. Through a series of short interviews with him, and testimonies given at a symposium in his honour -- both just before he passed away in the spring of 2014 -- we discover what drove his lifelong passion for justice.


Thursday, September 4
BORN THAT WAY?
Pedophilia: the word alone conjures up the most unspeakable crimes. But is it a psychiatric disorder that can be treated? Or is it, as some new research indicates, it an orientation, innate and unchangeable. We speak with ex-offenders and doctors on both sides of the debate. This episode was researched and prepared by documentary filmmaker Andrew Munger.


Friday, September 5
MOSES ZNAIMER'S ideacity - Inside Ourselves
ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. IDEAS features highlights from the conference. In this episode: speakers peer deep inside us, examining DNA and organ-banking, and where biology goes. For more information about ideacity and future conferences, visit the ideacity website.





Monday, September 8
THE ENRIGHT FILES
Our monthly Monday night feature with Michael Enright, host of The Sunday Edition, in conversation with some of the most original and influential thinkers of our time.


Tuesday, September 9
HOW TO DO ORDINARY THINGS, Part 2
"Love doesn't mean doing extraordinary or heroic things. It means knowing how to do ordinary things with tenderness." In 1964, Jean Vanier bought a little house in northern France and invited two mentally disabled men to come and live with him. It was a radical approach to thinking about people on the fringe of society -- to live with them, and most importantly, learn from them, to look for their gifts. On the 50th anniversary of L'Arche, the now-international organization Jean Vanier started, a celebration of a Canadian humanitarian and visionary.


Wednesday, September 10
IN CASE OF FIRE IN A FOREIGN LAND
What does it mean when society collapses, when all you know and believe in is thrown into disorder? Who are you then? And where might you go to find yourself? On September 11, 1973, Chile was shattered by a military coup. On the eve of the anniversary, noted author Ariel Dorfman reflects on our "common humanity" in conversation with Philip Coulter.


Thursday, September 11
THE SORROWS OF EMPIRE
Soon after 9/11, Chalmers Johnson argued that the United States would begin to indulge in "imperial overstretch"-- debasing its own society, and any others it might try to police, including Iraq. He went on to suggest that failure in Iraq might mark the beginning of the end of The American Empire. IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell revisits that conversation, and provides an update from Iraqi history professor, Thabit Abdullah.


Friday, September 12
MOSES ZNAIMER'S ideacity - Extending Ourselves
ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. IDEAS features highlights from the conference. In this episode: Higher, faster, stronger, and more daring. Speakers wonder just what are our physical limits. For more information about ideacity and future conferences, visit the ideacity website.






Monday, September 15
OH SAY, CAN YOU SEE?
In the fourth part of IDEAS' ongoing commemoration of the War of 1812, host Paul Kennedy visits the battlefields at Washington (where the White House was famously
torched) and Baltimore (which ultimately inspired the American national anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner").


Tuesday, September 16
WACHTEL ON THE ARTS
A monthly IDEAS feature with CBC Radio's celebrated arts journalist Eleanor Wachtel. Each month, she takes an in-depth look at what's new, exciting and important in film, opera, the visual arts, theatre, dance and architecture.


Wednesday, September 17
SHIFTING BORDERS
Spur is a talk series held across Canada in 2014 and organized by the Literary Review of Canada, and features speakers who try to envision what the world will look like in seven years. One of the speakers was Diane Francis who spoke in Calgary about the shifting sands of geopolitical realities. She later joined host Paul Kennedy in studio where the two teased out the implications of her predictions.


Thursday, September 18
BEYOND HUMAN RIGHTS
Payam Akhavan teaches international law at McGill and has worked in and appeared at international courts in The Hague. In the 2014 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture, presented by The Laurier Institution, Payam Akhavan argues that our world needs more than laws and legal niceties: it has to be built on empathy.


Friday, September 19
MOSES ZNAIMER'S ideacity - Augmenting Ourselves
ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. IDEAS features highlights from the conference. In this episode: Humans love tools, and speakers explore new devices for doing things -- maybe even leaving the earth. For more information about ideacity and future conferences, visit the ideacity website.






Monday, September 20
BIOINVASION: ATTACK OF THE ALIEN SPECIES!
Millions of YouTube viewers have seen the jumping silver carp. It can weigh up to 100 lbs, leap 10 feet in the air and hit you square in the face as you paddle your canoe. It's just the newest in a long line of "celebrity alien invaders". Barbara Nichol examines the phenomenon of invasive species: a story as much about human nature as it is about nature.


Tuesday, September 23
UNDOING FOREVER
Extinction is supposed to be forever. But in labs around the world, scientists -- using the latest biotechnology -- are trying to bring extinct animals back to life. From passenger pigeons to woolly mammoths, Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.


Wednesday, September 24
HIT DELETE
Some neuroscientists believe they are on the verge of being able to delete memories. It could mean a cure for people who suffer from PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder). But at what cost to the individual and at what cost to society? Dick Miller delves into the science and the ethics of memory deletion.


Thursday, September 25
GENETIC GENIUS
2014 Friesen Prize Winner Lap-Chee Tsui talks with IDEAS host Paul Kennedy about how a boy who remembers raising tadpoles in Hong Kong became the scientist who ultimately isolated and identified the gene that causes cystic fibrosis.


Friday, September 26
MOSES ZNAIMER'S ideacity - Remaking Ourselves
ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. IDEAS features highlights from the conference. In this episode: speakers ponder how we can start to really understand other people, and other cultures and ways of thought. For more information about ideacity and future conferences, visit the ideacity website.





Monday, September 29
VOYAGE OF THE "UNDESIRABLES": REMEMBERING THE KOMAGATA MARU
They were Canada's first boat people: 100 years ago, the freighter Komagata Maru, carrying 376 Punjabi immigrants from British India, was prevented from landing in Vancouver. Producer Yvonne Gall tells the story of this shameful chapter in our history, and how it still resonates today.


Tuesday, September 30
MACHIAVELLI: THE PRINCE OF PARADOX
Niccolo Machiavelli's name is synonymous with treachery and cunning. His most famous book, The Prince, was written exactly 500 years ago, and since then it's inspired political leaders around the world. It's been called a handbook for gangsters. Yet some scholars believe that it's a brilliant satire. IDEAS producer Nicola Luksic explores the case for both sides.



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