Schedule

October 2014



October


Wednesday, October 1
THE DEGROWTH PARADIGM
The degrowth movement is a relatively new contender in the economic and political debates that swirl around humanity's future. Degrowthers believe we need a more modest and sane alternative to the constant pressures of expansion that are destroying the ecological basis of our existence. Author and essayist Richard Swift explores the degrowth alternative, in theory and in practice.


Thursday, October 2
IDEAS FROM THE TRENCHES - Too Dumb for Democracy
There are 50,000 PhD candidates in Canada, toiling away in relative obscurity on things their friends and families often don't understand. This is the fourth episode in our series attempting to turn a young scholar's PhD work into an hour of radio. Producers Tom Howell and Nicola Luksic meet University of British Columbia student David Moscrop. He argues that modern democracy just isn't built right for our brains... and so it dooms us into dumb thinking. He's got an idea for fixing that.


Friday, October 3
MOSES ZNAIMER'S IDEACITY CONFERENCE - Beyond Ourselves
ideacity is a three-day gathering of minds held each June in Toronto, produced and presented by Moses Znaimer. IDEAS features highlights from the conference. In this episode: Humanity shares a complex world with other species.  Speakers ponder how we can see ourselves as part of that larger context. For more information about ideacity and future conferences, visit the ideacity website.






Monday, October 6
THE ENRIGHT FILES - The Public God
Last April, The Sunday Edition held a public forum called The Public God to explore the role of religion in the public sphere. Six distinguished panelists joined Michael Enright to ponder and debate such issues as the role religion should play in public policy, how far society should go to accommodate everyone's religious rights, what happens when religious convictions collide with the general public interest and the place of religion in a pluralistic, secular society.


Tuesday, October 7
CLAIMING SPACE
Public spaces, from parks to sidewalks to transit, have a huge impact on millions of women around the world. They can help make life enjoyable and safe, or dangerous -- sometimes even lethal. Contributor Megan Williams travels from India to Vienna to talk to sociologists, city planners, and cultural historians. She reveals how the conception and design of public space profoundly affects the lives of women who move through it.


Wednesday, October 8
GREEN GROWTH: CAN PROFITS HELP THE PLANET?
It's widely acknowledged that unfettered economic growth is impossible. Yet our reliance on fossil fuels and a growth-based economy seem intractable. So is the notion of "green growth" the answer? Is there a way to capitalize on capitalist motives and practices and live sustainably? IDEAS host Paul Kennedy hosts a panel at the University of Ottawa which wrestles with these very questions.


Thursday, October 9
ON THE MOVE WITH TRUCKERS
By definition, travel is part of every trucker's job description. They foreshadow a world where jobs are far from stable, and workers are increasingly expected to be mobile, as part of their employment. IDEAS host Paul Kennedy continues to report on a coast-to-coast study about how traveling affects almost everything else in our lives, with a look at the lives of several truckers from Prince Edward Island.


Friday, October 10
LOST INNOCENCE, Part 1 - Little Fighters: Children in the Resistance
A rebroadcast of the highly-acclaimed award-winning CBC Radio series commemorating the outbreak of World War II.  In this hour we hear the remarkable testimony of courageous children who fought against the Nazis in occupied Europe.





Monday, October 13
AUROVILLE: THE ROAD TO UTOPIA
People have been dreaming about finding, or creating, Utopia for ages. Ashley Walters travels to India, to the community of Auroville, to see how its utopian ideals have been realized, and sometimes compromised, in this age-old quest.


Tuesday, October 14
ODE TO THE ORGAN
It's the world's largest, most complex - and powerful - musical instrument. The pipe organ lifts us out-of-the-ordinary and fills us with awe. From cathedrals to arenas, Eitan Cornfield pulls out all the stops to explain why organs still matter in our increasingly secular world.


Wednesday, October 15
THE VIXEN AND THE VIRGIN - Women, Espionage and Propaganda in WW1
Two independent women find themselves in front of firing squads during the First World War. Nurse Edith Cavell is heralded as a heroine and a saint. Exotic dancer and courtesan Mata Hari becomes a symbol of evil and the enemy within. The propaganda that followed their executions delineated clear rules of what patriotic women should and should not be. Producer Nicola Luksic learns these women have more in common than meets the eye.


Thursday, October 16
SCRUTINIZING ROGER SCRUTON
Philosopher Roger Scruton is widely considered one of Britain's leading conservative thinkers. In April 2014, a conference was held in his honour at McGill University, called Thinking the Sacred with Roger Scruton. There and elsewhere, he argues that we need a sense of the transcendent to make sense of our lives.


Friday, October 17
LOST INNOCENCE, Part 2 - War at a Distance
Almost every child has an indelible memory of where they were and what they were doing when the war broke out. Those who were children on the Canadian homefront tell of their fears and excitement. When fathers went away, mothers took charge, and kids threw their hearts into the war effort.





Monday, October 20
INHOTIM: VISIONS IN PARADISE
Inhotim, Brazil, started as the vast estate and art collection of mining magnate Bernardo Paz. But what began as an oasis of beauty has become a laboratory for Paz's vision of a better society. Simon Nakonechny heads south to find out if one man's dream can become a region's salvation.


Tuesday, October 21
WACHTEL ON THE ARTS - Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet is one of the most adventurous and imaginative filmmakers at work today.  Although Spanish -- or, rather, Catalan -- by birth, based in Barcelona, she has set and shot features in Tokyo, New York, the North Sea, and even the Arctic.  Crossing borders and languages, her films are psychologically complex and often melancholic, dashed with humour. Since her breakthrough 2003 film My Life Without Me, Coixet has won wide recognition for her intimate storytelling and distinctive technique.  Her latest movie, Learning to Drive, takes her in a new, lighter direction. Coixet talks to Eleanor about the ideas, experiences and lifelong passion for film that inspire her work.

Wednesday, October 22
BEHIND THE THRONE
The Empress Dowager Cixi was in effect the ruler of China for decades during the late-19th and early-20th centuries, pitting enemy against enemy from her position close to the throne. Edith Wilson, wife of Woodrow Wilson, was "accused" of being the first female President of the USA. Biographers Jung Chang and Kristie Miller talk about the machinations of women who work 'behind the throne'.


Thursday, October 23
ISLAM AND THE ENVIRONMENT
When Islam is featured in popular media, it's often in the context of conflict: extremism, radicalism, fundamentalism. But Dr. Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Professor of Islamic Studies at George Washington University, has a surprising perspective on his own faith: that it's deeply predisposed towards environmental stewardship. In a public lecture and later interview with IDEAS host Paul Kennedy, Dr. Nasr explains why Islam may well be seen as a 'green' religion


Friday, October 24
LOST INNOCENCE, Part 3 - Children of the Holocaust

On October 6, 1943, Heinrich Himmler, chief of the S.S. declared it would not be wise to exterminate the adult Jewish men and women, leaving their children to "grow up to become avengers". The decision had to be made to annihilate every Jewish child as well. Two young girls who survived recall the horror of the Holocaust.






Monday, October 27
I'M SORRY: THE ART AND ARTIFICE OF THE APOLOGY
Prime Minister Stephen Harper apologizes to residential school survivors.  Bill Clinton says he's sorry for sexual transgressions. Whether apologies come from the political elite or your next door neighbour, we are awash in a sea of "I'm sorry". Josh Bloch examines when an apology is effective and whose interests it serves.


Tuesday, October 28
THE BALLAD OF TIN EARS
Many of us love to sing, but we're not all good at it. Some of us can't even carry a tune and are told not to sing. Tim Falconer dives into neuroscience, psychology -- and music itself -- to find out why he's a bad singer - and if there's anything he can do about it.


Wednesday, October 29
THE LIMITLESS VISION OF ROBERT LEPAGE
World renowned stage director and filmmaker Robert Lepage delivers the 2014 Lafontaine-Baldwin Lecture.


Thursday, October 30
THE GODFORSAKEN SEA
"Below 40 south there is no law; below 50 there is no God." The Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica is the most dangerous and least understood of our great oceans. A few solo sailors and a historian join Philip Coulter on a radio expedition to find out about those giant waves and fearsome storms, and what happens to people who go to the loneliest place on the planet.


Friday, October 31
LOST INNOCENCE, Part 4 - Like There Was No Tomorrow
World War Two drew everyone into its aura of excitement, danger and drama.  It made people more keenly aware of each other; it brought them together and tore them apart. For teenagers, it was a special time to be growing up -- the war set the stage of magical beginnings of innocent relationships, infatuations, and love.




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