IDEAS   Schedule - January 2013

Tuesday, January 1
ALMOST ANNUAL IDEAS LEVEE
Whenever January 1 falls on a weekday, IDEAS host Paul Kennedy convenes a New Year's Levee for producers and freelancers. They provide our listeners a 'sneak preview' of projects they are working on for IDEAS over the next few weeks and months.

Wednesday, January 2
THE LONGEVITY PUZZLE
In a cluster of quiet mountain villages in Sardinia, Italy, something unusual is happening. A remarkable number of people are living into their hundreds. And in this global hotspot for longevity, there are nearly as many male as female centenarians. Susan Pinker takes us to the Blue Zone of Sardinia as she searches for the answers to - Why?

Thursday, January 3 - Friday, January 4
RISK
On the simplest level, we take risks to derive benefits. If the benefit outweighs the risk, we’ve made a good decision. But decisions are subject to bias, even those of experts. How do we live with uncertainty and make good decisions? Vancouver broadcaster Kathleen Flaherty talks with risk takers, risk managers and risk assessors to find out.


Monday, January 7
THE ENRIGHT FILES
Our monthly Monday night feature with Michael Enright, host of The Sunday Edition, in conversation with some of the most original and influential thinkers of our time.

Tuesday, January 8
WORTHY PARASITES: A VILLAIN'S SILVER LINING
People hate parasites. They're slimy and repulsive - worms emerging from blisters on the body, mites breeding in skin folds. They hold wild parties in our guts. They bring pestilence, misery...even death. But wait: parasites can also be good - really, really good! Author Rosemary Drisdelle explores these much maligned creatures and their importance in nature, and she unveils exciting new medical research into the good they can do for us.

Wednesday, January 9
GENIUS BORN OF ANGUISH, Part 1
"The greatest trap in our life is not success, popularity or power, but self-rejection," said Henri Nouwen, Catholic priest, teacher and closeted gay celibate. He has been called a psychologist of the soul. Born in Holland in 1932, Nouwen wrote thirty-nine books about spirituality. He taught at Yale, Harvard and the Menninger Clinic, one world's leading psychiatric hospitals. Concerned about people whom society had rejected, Nouwen spent the last ten years of his life working with mentally challenged people at the Daybreak L'Arche community north of Toronto. A profile by Michael Higgins based on Nouwen's writings, interviews with those who knew him, and archival recordings of Nouwen himself. Part 2 airs Wednesday, January 16; Part 3 airs Wednesday, January 23.

Thursday, January 10
GEORGE MACMARTIN'S BIG CANOE TRIP
In 1905, George MacMartin, Treaty Commissioner for Ontario, accompanied by federal commissioners and native guides, journeyed through rapids and hiked through the wilds to meet with First Nations leaders. The result was James Bay Treaty Nine. The treaty put northern Ontario into Canadian hands, but First Nations' tradition is clear: their leaders agreed to share the land, not give it away. Christopher Moore, historian and winner of a 2011 Governor General's Literary Award, explores what the diary by George MacMartin reveals, and what it means today.  Produced by Sara Wolch.

Friday, January 11
THE NATION OF HOCKEY, PART 1
The back of our five dollar bill shows kids playing shinny on a timeless pond somewhere in Canada. But Calgary writer Bruce Dowbiggin argues that hockey is far more than simple nostalgia or big business. It's a clear window into the complexity of modern Canada: from shifting political power and economics, to multiculturalism and what we think it means to be a Canadian in the 21st century. Part 2 airs Friday, January 18.



Monday, January 14
BUILDING BRAINS
Recent recipient of the Friesen Prize in Health Science Research, Dr. Marc Tessier-Lavigne identified important mechanisms for the formation of the normal human brain, which ultimately opened new frontiers in the world of neuro-degeneration, and spinal chord injuries. He talks with Paul Kennedy.

Tuesday, January 15
WACHTEL ON THE ARTS
A monthly IDEAS feature with CBC Radio’s celebrated arts journalist Eleanor Wachtel. Each month, she takes an in-depth look at what’s new, exciting and important in film, opera, the visual arts, theatre, dance and architecture.

Wednesday, January 16
GENIUS BORN OF ANGUISH, Part 2
"The greatest trap in our life is not success, popularity or power, but self-rejection," said Henri Nouwen, Catholic priest, teacher and closeted gay celibate. He has been called a psychologist of the soul. Born in Holland in 1932, Nouwen wrote thirty-nine books about spirituality. He taught at Yale, Harvard and the Menninger Clinic, one world's leading psychiatric hospitals. Concerned about people whom society had rejected, Nouwen spent the last ten years of his life working with mentally challenged people at the Daybreak L'Arche community north of Toronto. A profile by Michael Higgins based on Nouwen's writings, interviews with those who knew him, and archival recordings of Nouwen himself. Part 3 airs Wednesday, January 23.

Thursday, January 17
STRETCHING THE CANVAS
Calgary artist John Will's greatest work of art may be John Will himself. He is a trouble-maker, scamp, and rapscallion. Jim Brown takes us on a guided tour of Will's latest: the first-ever visual art show created for radio.... through the life of a bohemian extraordinaire.

Friday, January 18
THE NATION OF HOCKEY, PART 2
The back of our five dollar bill shows kids playing shinny on a timeless pond somewhere in Canada. But Calgary writer Bruce Dowbiggin argues that hockey is far more than simple nostalgia or big business. It's a clear window into the complexity of modern Canada: from shifting political power and economics, to multiculturalism and what we think it means to be a Canadian in the 21st century


Monday, January 21
VASARI'S MOST EMINENT LIVES
In the mid-1500s, Giorgio Vasari's short biographies created art history, the artist as genius and even the "Renaissance". Although rife with inaccuracies and outright lies, his book is still the source on Leonardo, Michelangelo, and many others. Tony Luppino leafs through Vasari's Lives to see how it still shapes our ideas of art.

Tuesday, January 22
ICEBERG SHIP HABBAKUK
1942: Hitler’s U-Boats are ravaging merchant ships that Britain depends on for its survival. Enter a plan, for a gigantic warship, to help the Allies win the Battle of the Atlantic. It will be built in Canada and made from … ice! Richard Longley tells the story of iceberg ship Habbakuk, in all its icy eccentricity.

Wednesday, January 23
GENIUS BORN OF ANGUISH, Part 3
"The greatest trap in our life is not success, popularity or power, but self-rejection," said Henri Nouwen, Catholic priest, teacher and closeted gay celibate. He has been called a psychologist of the soul. Born in Holland in 1932, Nouwen wrote thirty-nine books about spirituality. He taught at Yale, Harvard and the Menninger Clinic, one world's leading psychiatric hospitals. Concerned about people whom society had rejected, Nouwen spent the last ten years of his life working with mentally challenged people at the Daybreak L'Arche community north of Toronto. A profile by Michael Higgins based on Nouwen's writings, interviews with those who knew him, and archival recordings of Nouwen himself.
 

Thursday, January 24
A SERPENT’S TALE
World religions and ancient mythology are replete with snake imagery and folklore. Whether we fear them, love them, pray to them, keep them as pets or eat them to increase virility, snakes have fascinated humans for millennia. IDEAS contributor Hassan Ghedi Santur discusses the mysterious evolutionary history of snakes and their fearsome reputation. Along the way, he confronts his own case of ophidiophobia - you guessed it: the “abnormal fear of snakes.”

 

Friday, January 25
VALLEY OF THE DEER
Canadian video artist Jillian McDonald spent much of the past year as ‘artist in residence’ at Glenfiddich Distillery, in the highlands of Scotland. As a Burns’ Night tribute to both Art and Whisky, IDEAS host Paul Kennedy visits her in Dufftown, and watches while she makes single-malted art.



Monday, January 28
PAYING FOR PARKING
We engineer our roads to accommodate traffic, but cars and other vehicles spend almost all their time parked. All those parking spaces - and finding them - cause huge economic, environmental, and even social problems. Dave Redel searches for a good spot to survey the situation.

Tuesday, January 29
WHY GO TO FOGO?
As a young woman, Zita Cobb left her birthplace - the relatively remote island of Fogo, off the east coast of Newfoundland - to get an education, and ultimately to find her fortune. Not long ago, she returned to invest that considerable fortune turning Fogo into a place of pilgrimage for artists. IDEAS host Paul Kennedy takes a tour with guide Zita Cobb.

Wednesday, January 30 - Thursday, January 31
THE SCIENCE OF MORALITY
How do we know right from wrong? For centuries, religion and philosophy tried to provide answers. Now psychology, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology are weighing in. What can science tell us about our moral beliefs? And where, exactly, do morals come from? Science journalist Dan Falk investigates.