Conflicted Cities

Four-year-old Portia runs to Abdul Haji for safety during a shooting spree at Westgate shopping centre in Nairobi, September 21, 2013. Photo credit: Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Four-year-old Portia runs to Abdul Haji for safety during a shooting spree at Westgate shopping centre in Nairobi, September 21, 2013. Photo credit: Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Listen

It used to be that countries waged war against each other on a battlefield. But now cities are the new conflict zone. From London to Madrid, Baghdad to Nairobi, and Beirut to Mogadishu, civilians on their way to work or just having lunch are caught in the cross-fire. And it's not just terrorism threatening daily life in the city. Climate change, drug cartels and political revolutions all feed a ballooning security industry that promises us safety. IDEAS Contributor Hassan Ghedi Santur explores what happens when our neighbourhoods become high value targets.



Participants in the program:

David Kilcullen, Counter-insurgency expert and the author of Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla.

Rasna Warah, Nairobi-based writer and journalist.

Ahmed Fadaam, A native of Baghdad. He lived through the U.S invasion of Iraq.

Jennifer Hyndman, Director of the Centre for Refugee Studies at York University.

Abdul Haji, Businessman based in Nairobi, and one of the armed civilians involved in helping people during the Westgate Mall attack in Nairobi.

Kevin Walby, Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at University of Winnipeg.

Dr. Ameet Aggarwal, Nairobi-based Gestalt therapist and Naturopathic doctor.


Related Websites
:

Inside Nairobi's Devastated Westgate Mall - The New York Times - Photographs by Tyler Hicks


Image Gallery


Nairobi is a good case study in the creeping militarization of cities around the world in response to terrorism and organized crime. There has been a crackdown on Somali refugees in Eastleigh, also known as "Little Mogadishu" since the September 2013 attack by the Somali radical group Al-shabab. Photographs by Hassan Ghedi Santur.



Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.