The Revolution Will Be Extruded

These stylized plastic armadillos are the 3D version of a 2D printed logo used by David Gerhard's computer lab at the University of Regina. Photo by Karen Murray.

These stylized plastic armadillos are the 3D version of a 2D printed logo used by David Gerhard's computer lab at the University of Regina. Photo by Karen Murray.

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There's a lot of buzz about 3-D printers -- guns! skin grafts! pizza in space! But as Regina computer scientist David Gerhard discovers, these machines, and the people who use them, are about to revolutionize the way we think about manufacturing, and how we get stuff.


Participants in the program:

Natalia Krasnodebska, Community Manager, Shapeways, New York.

Chris Anderson, author of Makers: The New Industrial Revolution and CEO of 3drobotics and DIY Drones, Berkeley CA.

Sam Cervantes, founder of Solidoodle 3-D printers, New York.

Cory Doctorow, science fiction author & futurist, London UK.

Matt Griffin, Director of Community & Support, Adafruit Industries, New York.

Michael Cima, Professor Materials Science & Engineering, MIT.

Raphael Abrams, co-founder of New York City Resistor hackerspace.

Rylan Grayston, inventor Peachy Printer, Yorkton SK.

Sherry Lassiter, Program Manager for Fab Labs, Centre for Bits & Atoms, MIT.

Robert Swartz, consultant for Fab Labs, MIT.

Nadia Peek, PhD student, Centre for Bits & Atoms, MIT.


Related Websites:


CBC News - 3D printed gift ideas that look amazing

The Center for Bits and Atoms, MIT, is one of the world leaders in research into 3D printing and related technologies.   

New York City Resistor is a collaborative hackerspace that developed some of the first consumer grade 3D printers, including the Makerbot.  

Solidoodle is an inexpensive brand of 3D printer developed by a former employee in the Makerbot project.

The aRMADILo lab at the University of Regina where David Gerhard and his students experiment with 3D printers and other technologies. 

Canadian science fiction writer Cory Doctorow's website

Shapeways is a company where users can send designs to be printed on large industrial 3d printers, and the objects are then shipped back to the user. 

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