Brain Bang Theory

Patrice Bergeron of the Boston Bruins lay on his back after being checked from behind during a game in 2007. He sustained a concussion and broken nose. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

Patrice Bergeron of the Boston Bruins lay on his back after being checked from behind during a game in 2007. He sustained a concussion and broken nose. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

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Dr. Charles Tator grew up loving hockey. Now, as an eminent neurosurgeon, scientist and researcher, he must face the patients and the families of those who suffer from concussions, spinal cord injury and disability. He's learned a lot about traumatic sports injuries and he sits down with IDEAS host Paul Kennedy to tell Canadians what they might not want to hear.



brain-bang-tator.jpgCharles Tator has been described as this country's concussion guru. He's is a senior scientist at Toronto Western Hospital and its Research Institute.

Dr, Tator is neurosurgeon who in 1974 set up Canada's first acute spinal cord injury unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre in Toronto. He's been actively involved with the injury prevention group Think First, which has now been folded into an umbrella organization called Parachute.

Paul Kennedy sat down with Charles Tator to talk about his career, concussions, and all the complications  that swirl around what has been  called the "invisible injury."




Related Websites:


Think First

Parachute

Stop Concussions

The Canadian Sports Concussion Project

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