Week of Jan 27

Monday, January 27
TED TALKS - HAVES AND HAVE-NOTS
About three billion people live in poverty today. That's almost one out of every two people. How did we get to such a chasm between the rich and poor? And what should we, and shouldn't we, do about it? TED Radio Hour presenter Guy Raz features speakers from the TED Talks series to help answer those questions.


Tuesday, January 28
A TRIBUTE TO PETE SEEGER
To honour the memory of activist and folk-singer Pete Seeger (1919-2014), IDEAS rebroadcasts a tribute that was originally prepared few years back, by Dr. Joe MacInnis and IDEAS host Paul Kennedy. It's an hour of memories and music from a legendary human being.


Wednesday, January 29
ART WE LIVE IN
We love and hate them, but we can't escape them either - we're all obliged to live and work in buildings, and we all have strong feelings about how they look, how they function, and how they affect us. Witold Rybczynski plays architecture tour guide to explore some big questions: What makes buildings work (or not)? What were the architects thinking? And what do buildings tell us about ourselves, our times and what we do?


Thursday, January 30
WILD JOURNEY: THE ANNE INNIS STORY
At the age of 23, Anne Innis was the first person to study African wildlife in its natural habitat. She blazed a trail that was distinctly Canadian, like her father, the political economist, Harold Innis. Sandy Bourque's documentary, told through Anne's eyes, is the story of one woman's courage and determination to study wild giraffe in South Africa in the 1950s. She offers a provocative witness to the terrible ease and disturbing normality of what would later come to be known as apartheid.


Friday, January 31
MIND AND MACHINE, Part 2
Computers can defeat grandmasters at chess and trump the best trivia-hounds at Jeopardy!. Today they can help us navigate the drive home; soon they'll be doing the driving for us. Sixty years ago, Artificial Intelligence - "AI" - was in its infancy. Now it promises to transform our world beyond recognition. In this two part series, science journalist Dan Falk explores the new promise and peril of intelligent machines.


Ideas in the Afternoon - Monday, January 27
THE GREAT BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE, Part 1
We used to need libraries to make the sum of human knowledge available to all. Today we have Wikipedia, where the sum of human knowledge can be shaped by all of us. But can we trust it? Philip Coulter suggests that the collective mind is perhaps the best mind we have.



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