Week of Sept 30

Monday, September 30
THE AUTHOR AS FICTION
In 1994, Dutch novelist Arnon Grunberg won the prize for best first novel in Holland. Six years later, using a different name, he won the same prize once again. He talks about various literary shenanigans with Paul Kennedy. (Recorded in front of an audience, at Montreal's Blue Metropolis Literary Festival.)

Tuesday, October 1
HOW WE KILL IN WAR
With every evolution in military technology comes a shift in military tactics. And each shift in tactics pushes our understanding of what is permissible and what is ethical behaviour in war. The American military's use of drones brings with it uncomfortable moral questions. Journalist Naheed Mustafa visits Pakistan and explores the dilemmas posed by drone warfare.


Wednesday, October 2
SAILING ALONE AROUND THE WORLD
In 1895 a retired Canadian sea captain set off to sail alone around the world. It had never been done, and it took Joshua Slocum three years, but the book of his adventures made him famous. Since then, fewer than 200 people have sailed in his wake and two of them are also Canadian.  Philip Coulter explores this greatest challenge sailors set for themselves - possibly the greatest of all human challenges.


Thursday, October 3
DANCING IN THE DARK: THE INTELLIGENCE OF BEES
Bees are remarkable among insects. They can count, remember human faces, create mental maps and communicate through dance routines performed entirely in the dark. But are they intelligent? Even creative? Bee aficionado Stephen Humphrey, along with a hive of leading bee researchers and scientists, investigates the mental lives of bees.


Friday, October 4
NOMINATING LEONARD COHEN FOR A NOBEL PRIZE
In the first of several programs celebrating Paul Kennedy's 15 years as host of IDEAS, he revisits an "old chestnut" from his personal archive. This lively open forum was recorded at the 2005 Blue Metropolis Literary Festival in Montreal. Panelists include critic, Ed Palumbo; poet, translator and broadcaster, Michel Garneau; jazz singer, Karen Young; and poet George Elliot Clark.


Ideas in the Afternoon - Monday, September 30
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
"God is dead. And we have killed him." These notorious words were written by the 19th century German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche. Through his brilliant and explosive writings, he became known as a severe critic of religion and conventional morality. Nietzsche's work is full of pointed aphorisms and dramatic fables and have been eagerly read by generations of students. His philosophy and social criticism still resonate in the 21st century.


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