Week of June 17

Monday, June 17
THE MAKAR AND THE LAUREATES
What happens when a "sonnet" of Canadian Poets Laureate meets the Makar of Scotland, the Laureate of that land, in a Laureate Symposium? We eavesdrop as the poets ponder the role of poetry in a world of twitter. IDEAS producer Dave Redel finds the verse to be anything but blank.


Tuesday, June 18
WACHTEL ON THE ARTS
Eleanor Wachtel speaks with the Canadian architect, philanthropist and social entrepreneur Phyllis Lambert. Born into the Bronfman family of Montreal, she determined to distance herself and to give her life to art and architecture. In the 1950s, she convinced her father not to build what she saw as a "vile" skyscraper in New York City and instead became highly involved in the construction of the landmark Seagram Building designed by Mies van der Rohe. It's often called a turning-point for modern architecture, a moment when social responsibility, beauty and truth counted for more than egotism or mere commercial interests. Lambert later founded the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the world's leading museum dedicated to understanding architecture as an art form. Her new book is entitled Building Seagram.

Wednesday, June 19
THE CHOSEN, Part 2
The idea of the chosen has its roots in ancient Judaism, but it is a belief that continues to shape us today, consciously or unconsciously. In this two-part series IDEAS producer Frank Faulk examines how this Biblical concept is central to Western thought and culture, through the lens of religion, politics, and psychology.

Thursday, June 20
ICEBERG SHIP HABBAKUK
1942: Hitler's U-Boats are ravaging merchant ships that Britain depends on for its survival. Enter a plan, for a gigantic warship, to help the Allies win the Battle of the Atlantic. It will be built in Canada and made from ... ice! Richard Longley tells the story of iceberg ship Habbakuk, in all its icy eccentricity.

Friday, June 21
CANADA GOES DEEP
In the spring of 2012, Canadian film-maker James Cameron made headlines with a solo submarine dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench - the deepest place in the world's oceans. Also on the expedition were a core group of Canadians, including Dr. Joe MacInnis, who prepared the official National Geographic Society blog.


Ideas In The Afternoon - Monday, June 17
IN THEIR SHOES II
Every pair of shoes tells the story of a life. Canadian novelist Katherine Govier helps immigrant women tell their stories by having them write about the shoes they were wearing when they arrived in Canada. Paul Kennedy hears more entrancing stories in the second of two programs about The Shoe Project


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