Week of April 15

Monday, April 15
MUR-ÉCRAN, THE WINDSCREEN
Fermont, Quebec, was designed as the mining community of the future. Its 1.3 kilometre -long windscreen complex was built to shield residents from the bitter sub-arctic climate. Forty years later, contributor Simon Nakonechny heads north to find out what has become of this visionary town.


Tuesday, April 16
WACHTEL ON THE ARTS - Yoko Ono

A controversial, iconic figure, Yoko Ono is today regarded as a multi-media innovator. At 80, she remains an adventurous and committed conceptual artist and musician, celebrated internationally. In a rare conversation with Eleanor Wachtel, she talks about her traditional, privileged upbringing in Japan, harshly interrupted by World War II, and the spirit of creative experimentation that informs her work in all its variety.


Wednesday, April 17
THE VISIONARY, CONTROVERSIAL, ALBERT SCHWEITZER
When Albert Schweitzer died in 1965, the doctor from Alsace-Lorraine was held up to the world over as a paradigm of goodness. He was a European who sacrificed a life of comfort to tend to the sick, deep in central Africa. But IDEAS contributor Megan Williams finds that Schweitzer was also - and remains - as controversial as he was inspiring. His legacy of the well-intentioned westerner doing good deeds in a far-off land continues to pose uncomfortable questions about the role of medical aid in developing countries today, its long-term usefulness and its inherent traces of colonialism.

Thursday, April 18
WORTHY PARASITES: A VILLAIN'S SILVER LINING
People hate parasites. They're slimy and repulsive - worms emerging from blisters on the body, mites breeding in skin folds. They hold wild parties in our guts. They bring pestilence, misery...even death. But wait: parasites can also be good - really, really good! Author Rosemary Drisdelle explores these much maligned creatures and their importance in nature, and she unveils exciting new medical research into the good they can do for us.


Friday, April 19
LEGENDS OF THE KAINAI
Dramatizations of the old stories of the Blackfoot of southern Alberta, provide a glimpse into this ancient culture's sacred beliefs, traditions and heroes. CBC Radio's Legends Project compiles traditional oral stories, legends and histories of Canada's Inuit and First Nations, gathered in communities across the country. To find out more, visit the Legends Project website.


Ideas In The Afternoon - Monday, April 15
SAILING ALONE AROUND THE WORLD
In 1895 a retired Canadian sea captain set off to sail alone around the world. It had never been done, and it took Joshua Slocum three years, but the book of his adventures made him famous. Since then, fewer than 200 people have sailed in his wake and two of them are also Canadian. IDEAS contributor Philip Coulter explores this greatest challenge sailors set for themselves - possibly the greatest of all human challenges.


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